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GreatsavebyGerber

-= Part 5, getting to know your fellow board members: What is your home town (where you were born)?

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Jupiter, Florida (right next to West Palm Beach)

OMG I have an aunt and uncle there!

And I was born in Germany, but I consider Goldsboro NC my hometown. So deal.

Omg..really?? haha That's awesome. I liked having the warm weather and close beach access down there, but it kind of felt like the whole city was a retirement community. :lol: I'm much happier now that I'm in Raleigh.

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Born in Raleigh but live in Clayton for all of my 50 years.

Hubby born in New Columbia, PA but moved to NC 1981.

North Wilkesboro is a beautiful town. I envy!

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Jupiter, Florida (right next to West Palm Beach)

Boca Raton Florida. Pretty darn close! I live in cary now.

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test?

Was there a need to reply to my test? If you read the site help section, there's a bug in this thread and I was eliminating stuff.

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Raleigh

never lived anywhere else

Also Raleigh-born. Back when Rex Hospital was on the corner of Wade Ave and St. Mary's St (where ESC is now). RBC wasn't even a glimmer in the mind of its builders and I'm not even sure Carter-Finley was more than a hole in the ground (and it would have only been "Carter" then anyway -- the "Finley" came much later.) The only thing passing for an ice rink in town was Dorton Arena (former home of the IceCaps and the Carolina Cougars of the old ABA) and occasinoally Reynolds Coliseum (for Ice Capades and such). There was -- to my knowledge anyway -- no public rink available and NCSU may have still been NC State College. (If it wasn't, it wasn't far removed from it). The Beltline was at most a brief stretch of highway and until my sophomore year of high school ended at New Bern Ave. Wake Med was Wake Memorial Hospital and was brand spanking new (possibly not even open yet, though it would be by the time my kid brother was born in 1965). Fayetteville Street was a street from end to end, Jesse Helms was doing editorial commentary on WRAL, and mosquito trucks still drove through town spraying God knows what in a fog that blanketed everything (I can still smell it if I try hard enough). There were (I think) two public high schools in town (Broughton and Enloe I think, though I'm not certain about Enloe) and "White Flight" hadn't yet hit East and South Raleigh. Restrooms, lunch counters, water fountains and schools were still segregated (we were still four years from the Civil Rights Act) and few people thought this was strange. Eight years later Raleigh would see beer and wine shelves in the gorcery stores boarded up and a curfew in place in the aftermath of the MLK assasination. Poole Road was home to the local Soap Box Derby and on at least one occasion was also the site of a sizeable Klan rally (which -- if you're familiar with the area now -- is pretty ironic). "Shopping centers" were a fairly recent development and all-indoor malls were nonexistent until North Hills was built sometime around 1970. RDU airport had one terminal (the present day Terminal A sits there now, though I seriously doubt there's any of the original buiding still standing) and you still walked out on the ramp to board your flight. The "International" status was still decades in the future and the runway couldn't even accomodate the largest passenger jets of the era (which I believe were Boeing's 707 and Douglas's DC-8). United Airlines was pretty much "the" service out of RDU, though Eastern may have already been in the picture. TWA may have also had an occasional flight out. Cary and Apex were little more than crossroads communities and kudzu grew on everything that didn't move fast enough. There were "blue laws" that kept almost everything closed on Sunday and even Saturday wasn't much of a shopping day unless it was around Christmas. There was no "Acorn Drop" on New Year's Eve because there was no acorn to drop. The "old" civic center was at most still on the drawing board and the BB&T building (not the current one) was the only building in town taller than 4 or 5 stories. The Clarion on Hillsborough Street went up several years later and was known as "the round Holiday Inn". People still shopped downtown at Belks, JC Penney and Sears. Cameron Village consisted of a Boylan Pearce, a drugstore and a Sears and very little else. Everett Case was still coaching at State and if memory serves, Dean Smith hadn't yet turned up in Chapel Hill. The ACC consisted of 8 (I think) teams: UNC, NCSU, Duke and Wake (the Big Four) UVA, Clemson and South Carolina, and Maryland. But I'm not sure USC hadn't left the conference yet, also not sure that Maryland had entered. So it could have been 6 or 7 teams instead of 8. Either way, there was certainly no need for two divisions.

And hockey? That was something they played "up north" in a few (6) places, but we didn't know from it down heah.

In my adult life I lived in two other places (Charlotte and Ft. Hood, TX) and spent considerable time in two more (Ft. Wood, MO and Rantoul, IL). And I always came back.

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