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What is a sport that you don't consider to be a sport?

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If there's blood, then it's a sport. 069.gif

Re. sweat, blood and the circulatory system, dp, long-distance running is most definitely a sport. During the Los Angeles Marathon last March, two men lost their lives participating in the sport they loved best. One of them, a 53-year-old man, collapsed near the 18-mile point, while another -- a 60-year-old retired police officer -- died just short of the 22-mile mark. The cause of death for both men: coronary attack.

Luckily for us, Mr. GSBG and I go full blast whenever we run, but stop well short of the point where we'd need a trip to the ER. Mr. G, a slightly built man who ran six-minute miles in high school (that's a fact!), completed his first official 5K race in the 2005 Long Beach Marathon ... and his first running event since 1978, the year he graduated from high school. His 32:05 -- a mark slow by his own standards -- still caused him to break a crazy-*edit* sweat:

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His norm these days? Breaking 30 minutes, by at least 45 seconds.

On the other hand, I have a totally non-runner's body -- burly, bulky, and thick legged. I run because it feels good, keeps my muscles loose, burns calories, holds my hormones in check (I'm going through the first part of menopause), clears my head and mood, and maintains clear, unclogged arteries. While breaking 30 minutes on 5Ks is an expected daily goal for Mr. G, it remains a distant one for me: my PR (personal record) is a middling 34:15.

Even though I don't look like I've sweated for nearly seven hours and was sunburned big time, be assured that I was when Mr. G snapped this photo of me at the 26-mile mark of this year's LB marathon. Not counting 19 minutes restroom, rest (I nearly vomited at least 10 times), and drink stops, I kept running and race walking for six hours and 43 minutes nonstop ... even though my "chip time" read 7:02.

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By Mile 24, a one-inch blister between the balls of my right foot had burst, creating a small pool of blood and clear white fluid (not pus) in my sock. And even though I'd swabbed down most of my upper body with BodyGlide, I had so much chafing under my arms I bled.

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One more note: Mr. G and I were sweating our butts off in our respective running events. The reason you don't see any perspiration on our running gear is that we're both wearing CoolMax fabric: material that absorbs sweat immediately and, consequently, keeps an athlete's body from excessive sweat and overheating.

So there you have it ...

Jan/GSBG

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I can't really judge many of the questionable sports that I haven't actually played or tried as to wether or not it is a sport or not, but I think the ones that are truelly not a sport include

darts

poker

spelling

eating

and I actually watched minature golf tornament once on espn definately not a sport

I think the problem is when the line between game and sport occurs. There are more to sports then just brawn, you have to be smart too as well, at least if you want to be sucessful. Professional bowling is tougher then what you think it is, as is motorsports like nascar. Does that mean they are sports? eh, I can live with it being on the edge.

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equestrian (the real athlete isn't even human),

No offense, Shane, but you try and make 1200 pounds of animal jump a 6 foot fence in a time limit or in a certain pattern, and see if you still think that the rider is not an athlete.

Nowhere have I said it's easy. I see it being similar to race car driving. It takes skill but it's not nearly physically challenging enough to be classified a sport. No way does it stack up against things like rugby or wrestling...true sports that require you to be tough as nails.

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Cowtown: While I was in the stands watching batting practice at a major-league baseball game in July 1997, I was hit directly in the eye by a 100-mph-plus frozen-rope line drive ... and was send to the local hospital's urgent-care/trauma facility by ambulance ASAP. The diagnosis: a fractured right orbital bone (cheekbone), an injured retina of the right eye, and bruising on the brain. (Had the ball nailed me only two inches higher, I'd have died immediately.)

I got lucky. I was in bed for four weeks, healing my fractured face that was as swollen, distorted, and purple as a crushed plum. It didn't feel great that I couldn't see out of my eye for nearly a month, and that it was nearly impossible to eat, drink, talk, or breathe. So even though the entire right side of my face still feels heavy and numb, and will the rest of my life, I still am glad to alive, to be up and about ... and have my entire vision back again.

If there's blood, then it's a sport.

I bled so much that day that stadium officials removed the seat I collapsed onto, since I'd bled so much that it was impossible to remove all of the blood from the seat itself. Gory, but 100 percent true.

Jan/GSBG

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GSBG, that's quite a feat! I used to run before I blew my knee out and I know what you mean. Running isn't a sport, running is a way of life. :wink:

edit to add: I'm glad you're ok from the line drive. :shock:

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GSBG, that's quite a feat! I used to run before I blew my knee out and I know what you mean. Running isn't a sport, running is a way of life. :wink:

edit to add: I'm glad you're ok from the line drive. :shock:

Thank you so much, dp. And don't you give up on running because of an iffy knee: Get it right -- laser surgery, glucosamine/chondroitin tablets, physical therapy, whatever -- so you can get back out there yourself. You don't have to go all 26.2 miles (heck, that's a once-a-year-haul for me, given the amount of training needed to prepare for it), but try at least two or three miles four days a week. That way, you'll keep your cardiovascular system running in tip-top shape, your energy level as high as a kite, and your own physical shape -- which I'm sure your better half already enjoys -- looking sweet. 8)

In addition to everything I'd mentioned, running is something else: a way to prove to myself that I'm not gonna be an invalid because of a crazy-*edit* freak accident that happened almost a decade ago. If I run, that's proof that I'm alive and an active participant in a sport, not merely a spectator when I was much bigger.

Thanks again for the nice words, dp! Here's to your own quick recovery ... and enjoyable return to running. 8)

Jan/GSBG

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Soccer can be brutal as demonstrated by Zinedine Zidane. :lol:

955-Zidane.jpg

In Europe sometimes there's more action in the stands than on the field! :shock:

i have to agree; i have had many injuries in soccer; those were just my worst! but, i love the game; watching and playing! if it wasn't for hockey, it would be my favorite sport!

GSBG - I sent you a pm :D

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Soccer is a beautiful sport but it is sad what is becoming of it with all the diving and theatrics put on by players these days. My right ankle is now permanently damaged because I sprained it the day before our opening game this past season and played every minute of every game on it. It hurts quite a bit these days but if I could do it over again I wouldn't change a thing, I'd still play.

That doesn't even come close to all the injuries I've got from wrestling. Broken noses, cheek bones, fingers, constantly sprained wrists, damaged knees, concussions, a dislocated elbow, cauliflower ears and assorted bumps and bruises. There was never a time where I didn't have an injury of some sort. Eventually led to me having to call it quits as a competitor but I enjoyed the 8 years I spent competing. Numerous great memories I'll never forget and an involvement in a community of great people, I still coach and ref just to stay involved and give back.

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equestrian (the real athlete isn't even human),

No offense, Shane, but you try and make 1200 pounds of animal jump a 6 foot fence in a time limit or in a certain pattern, and see if you still think that the rider is not an athlete.

Nowhere have I said it's easy. I see it being similar to race car driving. It takes skill but it's not nearly physically challenging enough to be classified a sport. No way does it stack up against things like rugby or wrestling...true sports that require you to be tough as nails.

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree. You have to be in really good shape to ride in the equestrian games, and you can get broken/bruised/concussed/killed surprisingly easily if your skill level isn't quite adaquate for that particular horse.

You don't have to be in good shape to drive a car.

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I agree about soccer though, only sport i've ever broken a bone playing. (my arm) and SOOOO tiring. It's similar to hockey and probably my second favorite too.

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equestrian (the real athlete isn't even human),

No offense, Shane, but you try and make 1200 pounds of animal jump a 6 foot fence in a time limit or in a certain pattern, and see if you still think that the rider is not an athlete.

Nowhere have I said it's easy. I see it being similar to race car driving. It takes skill but it's not nearly physically challenging enough to be classified a sport. No way does it stack up against things like rugby or wrestling...true sports that require you to be tough as nails.

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree. You have to be in really good shape to ride in the equestrian games, and you can get broken/bruised/concussed/killed surprisingly easily if your skill level isn't quite adaquate for that particular horse.

You don't have to be in good shape to drive a car.

- I am no fan of nascar or formula racing, but I am sure you have to have some physical endurence to race cars professonally. And you can be fat or not in shape and still play a sport, it doesn't mean you will be sucessful, but there is no line that prevents you from doing it either. I guess its all a matter of opinion anyways.

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I agree about soccer ... and SOOOO tiring ...

Some years ago, I'd read that a typical soccer player -- not the goalkeeper -- runs about seven miles each game. For someone in shape with decent stamina, those seven miles aren't much.

(For what it's worth: I finished a "shorty" run today: 2.14 miles. Tomorrow morning, Mr. GSBG -- my running buddy -- will join me on the first of our four 5Ks next week.)

Jan/GSBG

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