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caniac23

Photography Gear Talk

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OK... I looked through several pages, and couldn't find anything really... so, I'm interested in talking photo gear when it comes to the Hurricanes games...

I'll be going to a couple of games this year down here with the Lightning and Panthers when the Canes come to their towns, but I'm not sure what kind of lens to use, and what kind of shutter speed I'll need. I'm still somewhat new to DSLR photography, but have been getting better. I currently have a Nikon D3000, with a 18-55 mm Nikkor lens. I plan on getting a telephoto lens somewhere between 50-200 or 70-300 or something similar. Any suggestions of lenses, camera settings (Canon and Nikon aren't too far apart).

Thanks for any information...

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OK... I looked through several pages, and couldn't find anything really... so, I'm interested in talking photo gear when it comes to the Hurricanes games...

I'll be going to a couple of games this year down here with the Lightning and Panthers when the Canes come to their towns, but I'm not sure what kind of lens to use, and what kind of shutter speed I'll need. I'm still somewhat new to DSLR photography, but have been getting better. I currently have a Nikon D3000, with a 18-55 mm Nikkor lens. I plan on getting a telephoto lens somewhere between 50-200 or 70-300 or something similar. Any suggestions of lenses, camera settings (Canon and Nikon aren't too far apart).

Thanks for any information...

You might want to ask Dreamie, she takes great photos. Also Sandpiper has a real knack for photography but I'm not sure she's still around.

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You might want to ask Dreamie, she takes great photos. Also Sandpiper has a real knack for photography but I'm not sure she's still around.

She is :) and thanks you for the kind words :)

sorry been among the missing. Short story is was laid off and have been job hunting. Still looking, but trying to get back into some of the things I let slip.

So, gear talk? let er rip. If I can't answer the question I might know someone who can.

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so gear talk? I have a Nikon D5000 and had the good fortune of being able to borrow a Tamron 70-200mm f2.8 for the end of the Rats last season/playoffs. I did not want to give it back. Feel free to check out the photos I took last season at Flickr. I've got the 55-200 lens that I shot most photos w/ though off the top of my head I'm blanking on the f for it. The 70-200 is sweet. It should run about 700-800 dollars new, and is why I don't own one yet.

OH and if you click the "Nikon D5000" link on the right side of the picture it will tell you the settings I used. Varied by location in the rink/which rink/which jersey (TU center is MURDER w/photo noise in the reds)

Edited by sandpiper214

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700-800?!? Ugh... that is out of my price range as well for a while... I'm still learning manual settings... I read a bunch on the D3000 and the D5000, but price was what seperated the two... the D3000 was on sale for 450 with the 18-55 lens, 2 gig card, case, and booklet... I know now, the SD card, booklet and case don't really mean much... I've learned how to control the lens manually... but as far as settings go, I'm still confused... I try doing the shutter speed, the aperture, the ISO settings... still confused. On the dial, I switch to portrait mode, and then manually focus in and out... if you can point me to a site where i could learn how to control the shutter speed and aperture on the same dial or wherever, would be greatly appreciated.

Is there a big difference between a 50-200 and a 70-200?? And if so, is Tamron a good brand, or are there other brands that are just as good and inexpensive.

Thanks. ;)

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I want to think some of this over and ask a few photo-friends a couple of questions. In the meantime I'd suggest a D3000 Dummies guide. If nothing else it gives you a good overview on how to work your camera. I have one for my 5000 and it works great. I've been told the manuals for the Nikons are packed with good helpful information. I have yet to read mine. I'm a 'I don't need no stinkin directions' ...usually followed by 'crud where'd I put that darn book so I can undo what I just did' kinda gal.

For visual tools check this link from the Pioneerwoman.com She's not sports related but she touches on some of the stuff you mentioned. Also check the Nikon site and Youtube for video tutorials. Wicked helpful.

Did you buy the camera from a camera store? Ask questions to the people who sold it to you. I find that people in that field are more than willing to help. If not a camera store, find one and chat w/them. I use Ritz photo and a smaller local store in Albany. They are the main reason my photos look the way they do (the good ones anyway :) ) I see a big difference between the lenses in my photos due to the f#. I believe the 2.8 lets in more light. Tamron is an excellent brand. I can't swear to it, but I don't know that you're going to find that lens cheaper than that. I know there's a site out there you can rent from relatively inexpensive, but I don't know the url offhand. I'll post that later too. My best advice on all of it is introduce yourself to some local photogs and ask questions. (Don't do it during a game btw. I'm not a pro and I know how I feel when people bug me when I'm shooting a game) I've only had one so far who couldn't be bothered and I suspect it's because he's not that good. Harsh, but that's my opinion. Every single other photographer I've spoken to (and I can name 13 off the top of my head) have not only happily answered question, but have given tips and suggestions as well.

Be back w/some more suggestions in a day or so but that should at least give you a place to start. Hope it's helpful

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Any 2.8 lens would be better than a 5.6 or higher. Even an f4 would be decent. Arenas don't offer perfect lighting, but it's not bad if you're down close. I've shot with an f5.6 and got decent pics...but an f2.8 is better.

At one time they wouldn't let you bring in "professional looking" cameras for cameras with detachable lenses, but I think they did away with that rule a couple years ago, right?

I unfortunately can't afford a good f2.8 but have a friend with one, and we use Canons...so I borrow his lens sometimes. It's the 70-200mm f2.8...it takes better pictures than I do!

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At one time they wouldn't let you bring in "professional looking" cameras for cameras with detachable lenses, but I think they did away with that rule a couple years ago, right?

Agree on all counts except the arena. It depends on the arena/team if they allow detachable lenses. If you call ahead make sure you ask for the PR or media person. I got all the way to Bridgeport after calling ahead and was told no. Unsure about NHL other than Hurricanes and Islanders. Hurricanes allow detachable lenses, Islanders do not

AHL I know that Albany (used to, no idea if still does), same for Springfield (both w/new teams/mgmt), Portland, Syracuse, Binghamton, Manchester, Adirondack, all allow them. Bridgeport,WBS, Hershey do not. I plan on e-mailing the teams this season so I have confirmation ahead of time. I'll post a list here once I hear back.

@caniac23 - I didn't forget you, been in the middle of some stuff. Will post a follow up to my original when I've got time

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Thanks for the kind words TSA.

I have a Nikon D300S and two Nikkor lenses: a 70-200mm/f2.8gVR and a 24-70mm/f2.8g. It's pretty decent equipment for shooting hockey photos, close to the low end of what the pros use. I'm not gonna lie to you, it's expensive camera gear.

That being said, almost any DSLR and telephoto lens can give good results if you're realistic about what you're going after. You need a wide aperture and fast shutter speed to capture full-on fast motion, but lower settings can give you very good still shots, shots in the faceoff circle, goalie shots, crowd shots, etc. If you're buying a new telephoto lens, within your budget price range, I would place a higher priority on the aperture (the lower the f-stop number the better) over the focal length.

If I could make a suggestion, try this... Set your camera to aperture priority and dial it down to the maximum (ie. lowest number) f-stop your lens can accommodate. Then set your ISO relatively high, say around 1600. Set your metering mode to matrix metering, which I have found to be the best Nikon setting for light metering in most arenas. Then, fire away and see what the camera and lens can do for you in terms of your shutter speed. If your shutter speed is around 1/250 to 1/320, you should start to be able to get a few action shots like battles along the boards, players skating before and after the puck is in play, etc. Use that as your benchmark. If your shutter speed isn't fast enough, set your ISO higher, like 2000 or 2400. You need a shutter speed of 1/640 or 1/800 (or higher) to capture really fast motion, so keep increasing your ISO and see how fast a shutter speed that gives you. I've found that it's easier to keep most of the settings consistent and make changes to only one or two parameters at a time to watch their effect on each other than it is to try to manage a lot of variables.

I think that's a good exercise to get you started, and the more photos you take and the more you see what the effect of one parameter is on the other, you will begin to learn what settings you can apply on your camera to increase your chances of success.

If I could give one piece of advice, I'd offer what Wayne Gretzky always said, you miss 100% of the shots you never take.

Oh, one other piece of advice. The best money you can spend on photography is the money you spend making yourself a better photographer. Good photographers can get excellent shots from their Blackberries and iPhones. It really isn't as much about the equipment as it is the person behind it (spoken like a true equipment diva).

Here's my Canes collection on flickr (there's also a link in my profile if you click on my screen name). If you click on a photo and select "Actions" and "View EXIF data", you'll see what camera settings I used for a particular shot.

As I always say when I post my links, don't re-use any of my photos anywhere else without first getting permission from me. Thanks!

Edited by Dreamie

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Hey Sandpiper? Do you get a royalty every time you mention The Pioneer Woman? If you don't, you should!

Not sure why it took me so long to finally start following her!

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