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Julia Rowe

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I’m really glad that the transplant went successful! It’s really sweet of Kelly to be tutoring Julia. And I just love that part about JWillie trying to get her to change fav players!! I know we all are praying for her and hope she gets healthy soon!! She is such a courageous girl, and very strong, I know she will get better.

Karen

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Laviolette said Julia Rowe, his 6 year old neighbor whose battle with leukemia was the inspiration for Laviolette's "Relentless" fund raising campaign for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, continues to recover at home from a bone marrow transplant.

"The six month mark is a crucial point," Lavi said. "I don't think anybody's out of the wood's yet, but she's progressing well and the transplant worked. It was a success, so we'll continue to keep our fingers crossed and hope for the best."

Rowe is being tutored by Kelly Williams, wife of Hurricanes forward Justin and a third grade teacher in Garner.

"I've been trying to change her favorite player from Eric Staal to me," Justin said, "I gave her a jersey and everything. I think I've almost got her."

This was a wonderful article. Hat's off to Julia. You're in our thoughts and prayers !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

awww i think that is so nice of Kelly.

haha and Justin is still working on switching her fav. player..

i think that is so cute. :)

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That's great to hear. Haha, maybe that's why Williams is doing so well this season.

There's a lot to be said for karma... and it sounds like the Williamses have some really good karma working.

I'm happier than you can imagine to hear this news. I lost my father to lukemia in 2000 and it's not a pretty thing to watch. I can't imagine if it were one of my kids that was going through it. That is not the natural order of things.

So to hear that she's responding well to treatment... well, it kinda puts things in perspective ya know?

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Laviolette said Julia Rowe, his 6 year old neighbor whose battle with leukemia was the inspiration for Laviolette's "Relentless" fund raising campaign for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, continues to recover at home from a bone marrow transplant.

Just a plea to become involved in the bone marrow donor registry one can do this when donating blood at the American Red Cross and, I believe, at the Rex Blood Center. Also donating platelets through a process called pherisis helps idividuals such as Julia.

I donated on a regular basis until I was deferred because of the MRIs I have been having to determine the reason for the deadness in my legs. I have been donating for over 20 years and want to get back ASAP. I am not that altruistic, it's mainly for the free lunch on Fridays. 8)

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I'm on the Bone Marrow registry plus I give blood at regular intervals. It's the least I can do for someone who wants to live. God Bless Julia and all those involved w/ her illness.

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Laviolette said Julia Rowe, his 6 year old neighbor whose battle with leukemia was the inspiration for Laviolette's "Relentless" fund raising campaign for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, continues to recover at home from a bone marrow transplant.

Just a plea to become involved in the bone marrow donor registry one can do this when donating blood at the American Red Cross and, I believe, at the Rex Blood Center. Also donating platelets through a process called pherisis helps idividuals such as Julia.

I donated on a regular basis until I was deferred because of the MRIs I have been having to determine the reason for the deadness in my legs. I have been donating for over 20 years and want to get back ASAP. I am not that altruistic, it's mainly for the free lunch on Fridays. 8)

Yes Lord! My dad was on a non-stop IV of platelets for the last several days before Hospice. The Red Cross prefers that I donate whole blood because of my blood type, but they get a unit every 8 weeks. I didn't think about the bone marrow registry connection though. Makes sense, I'll check on that in a few weeks when I go back. Thanks for the info Collie.

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I am serious about getting more individuals involved in donating platelets. If can't donate, I at least want to have someone take my place. Does anyone have a contact at Lavi's organization or in the Canes office who would be a contact in regards to raising an awareness of how much help is needed in this area.

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I am serious about getting more individuals involved in donating platelets. If can't donate, I at least want to have someone take my place. Does anyone have a contact at Lavi's organization or in the Canes office who would be a contact in regards to raising an awareness of how much help is needed in this area.

Good luck with that.

The Canes community relations director is Chris Diamond, but based on my attempts to get a blood drive going I'm not sure how much help you're gonna get there. And I don't know if Lavi actually has a formal "organization" of his own or if this was just something he started in conjunction with LLS. My guess is the latter since it takes two years for a non-profit to achieve 501-C(3) status with the IRS, and it's hard to get contributions unless they're deductible. (Trust me, I suffered through it with the Rottweiler Rescue until they finally got certified.)

In either case, LLS can probably answer the question for you -- and you might have better luck getting in touch with them than Coach right now. He's kinda busy at the moment. :lol:

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I registered with the bone marrow donor registry back when I first came to Goldsboro. I had been surprised that such a relatively small city could organize the big push for testing and registry then (someone in the community was in need, and people really got the word out and arranged a day at the local mall where you could sign up and get tested), when where I lived before (about 150,000 people at that time) ... not a word.

Since we're going to be consuming mass quantities, would it be possible or appropriate for a Red Cross connection to say do a collection off us for platelets or blood DURING THE ABSOLUTE EARLY HOUR(s) of our end-of-season tailgate gathering? by the time we're out of there, I'm pretty sure we'll have replaced our fluid volume back up to normal levels (haha).

Just a thought. I don't know how these things work, but we will have a relatively captive audience of upstanding citizenry all in one place...

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I was going to sign up for bone marrow donation, but my understanding is that you have to be willing to drop whatever you are doing and go get the surgery when there is someone who needs it. And your name has to be on the list for a certain length of time too. I am just not sure if I can do that right now. :(

I do donate blood though! :mrgreen: Haven't done the platelets, but I probably could

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I was going to sign up for bone marrow donation, but my understanding is that you have to be willing to drop whatever you are doing and go get the surgery when there is someone who needs it. And your name has to be on the list for a certain length of time too. I am just not sure if I can do that right now. :(

I do donate blood though! :mrgreen: Haven't done the platelets, but I probably could

When a match is made - long, long odds on this happening - the donation must be completed ASAP as marrow has a very short lifespan outside the human body. And one must be willing to travel to the patient's location. Patient's insurance should pick up all costs, From what I understand the only effect a donor should feel is a sore back for a few days, much like taking a bad fall on ice. But this is a small price to pay for giving someone another shot at life.

No greater love is this: that one should lay down his life for his friends - Jesus Christ.

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Since we're going to be consuming mass quantities, would it be possible or appropriate for a Red Cross connection to say do a collection off us for platelets or blood DURING THE ABSOLUTE EARLY HOUR(s) of our end-of-season tailgate gathering?

I will be willing to participate if we involve Rex Blood Services. I will not donate anything, including time, to anything or anyone remotely connected to the American Red Cross. Some of you may remember a study that was done post 9-11 comparing the Salvation Army to the ARC... The majority of $$ taken in by the ARC are used for salaries, namely the director's. Of all the relief organizations, the Salvation Army has the highest % of $$ going to the people who need it most. BOOOOOO the American Red Cross!!

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That is a great article. These Canes guys and their girls are great. I think Julia can have 2 favorites. Their all my favorites. Love all the Canes. Go Kelly and Justin. They are great in the community. Your are in our prayers Julia and family.

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My nephew, who is now 22, had a bone marrow transplant for leukemia when he was nine. The transplant took place the night before Thanksgiving, 1993. The diagnosis was made on April 5, 1993. I will never forget either one of those nights -- the emotions of both are still raw. I have not used the word 'devastated' as casually as I used to since then because my family and I learned what the word devastated felt like. Losing a big game is not devastation -- losing a job is not devastation -- being told your loved one - particularly a child -- has an illness that is probably terminal is truly devastating.

Long story short, his bone marrow donor came from The Netherlands. It is very difficult to find a donor with the exact matching marrow that is needed for a successful transplant. There are over 10,000 types of bone marrow - you only have a 1 in 4 chance of matching a sibling (you get half of your bone marrow DNA from one parent - half from the other so parents won't match you). The match has to be exact or really, really close because the body will fight off the 'invading' marrow if it is seen as 'foreign' by the body, resulting in death of the patient.

My nephew was extremely blessed and lucky. More blessed than lucky, though. He was given 6 months to live, and we found the donor through the National Marrow Donor Program at the end of those 6 months. We worked through the American Red Cross and The National Donor Marrow Program.

I've done a lot of speaking and writing about this inspiring event in the life of my family, most recently in my book about raising all boys, House of Testosterone -- it's a humor book, but a few essays are serious.

I don't think you have to drop what you are doing if you are contacted that you might be a match for someone. Even though Jacob needed the transplant desperately, there were still steps that had to be taken. Lots of info to the potential donor, more testing, etc. I don't think it's usually like, "We need you here now". And you can give at one of several NC hospitals -- you don't have to go to where the patient is.

Nowadays, there are many more people on the bone marrow registry of potential donors than when my nephew was sick. Back then, there were 800,000 worldwide, and now I know there is over 3 million or so last time I checked. Greatly increases the odds. Minorities are esp. needed to have the blood test that puts you on the registry of potential donors because minorities are USUALLY - not all the time, but usually, going to match someone of their own race, ethnic background. Our volunteer group to support my nephew - who is Caucasian -- won a national award in '97 for promoting the registry to minorities.

Now cord blood transplants are also a viable option, too. Those were very rare back when my nephew was sick. He had his transplant at Duke.

Another thing is that the blood test to go on the registry is so precise that it costs about $70 or so. Our group had to raise a lot of $ back then, too, to do the marrow drives we organized - it was only $60 then but we put over 8,000 people on the registry. We raised the $ through going to corporate sponsors - Glaxo was a big one for us as was Triangle Community Foundation. I went to WRAL-TV who agreed to sponsor our first "Marrowthon" drives where people came to take the blood test.

It used to be free for minorities to go on the registry because there was such a dire need for them, but I'm not sure where things stand with that now.

Boy, all of this info comes right back to me - seems like a long time ago, but I still remember all this stuff.

My sons and I were at the "Canes play-offs last year, and we bought a bunch of Relentless arm bands. Our prayers are with Julia; I know it's still at tough struggle after the transplant. If she would like to meet my nephew, I'm sure he'd loved to do so.

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I was going to sign up for bone marrow donation, but my understanding is that you have to be willing to drop whatever you are doing and go get the surgery when there is someone who needs it. And your name has to be on the list for a certain length of time too. I am just not sure if I can do that right now. :(

I do donate blood though! :mrgreen: Haven't done the platelets, but I probably could

When a match is made - long, long odds on this happening - the donation must be completed ASAP as marrow has a very short lifespan outside the human body. And one must be willing to travel to the patient's location. Patient's insurance should pick up all costs, From what I understand the only effect a donor should feel is a sore back for a few days, much like taking a bad fall on ice. But this is a small price to pay for giving someone another shot at life.

No greater love is this: that one should lay down his life for his friends - Jesus Christ.

Yeah, I know....I will probably end up doing it in the future. I can deal with a bit of pain for someone else. The only problem I will have is dropping work to travel to wherever, but they will deal with it if I end up doing it :-)

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It's times like this that make me realize we cheer for the greatest hockey team in the world. Maybe not skillwise, but they are tremendous people and the fact that all of the fans are so supportive and willing to do things such as this really speaks to the character of this organization and its fans... you guys are all awesome.

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Dear House - thank you so much for taking the time to post a personal story. Your emotions are still raw and come through your writing very clearly.

Many of us who post here have participated in the bone marrow registry drives, and I hope that many more will participate during their lifetime. You so clearly state the difficulties in making viable matches which is why the enormous collection of potential donors is so desperately needed. I can think of nothing no more delightful - and AWESOME and miraculous than to get word that my little old blood is a match for someone in such circumstances of need.

There are so many ways for us to 'save a life' nowadays. Those of us able to 'give' I think are as fortunate as those whom the gifts benefit.

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