Jump to content
The Official Site of the Carolina Hurricanes
Sign in to follow this  
Concord_Cane

New Fan Here

Recommended Posts

Hello, I'm a new fan. I've always pulled for the Canes and occasionally would watch a hockey game, but I would like to fully immerse myself in the sport. I was a fan of the NBA, but due to the super teams and NBA putting their nose in politics I've given that league up. That gives me more time, money, and energy to spend on hockey. Basically, I need advice for being a full on hockey fan.

 

On another note, I'm I Tennessee Titans fan in the NFL, so I'm very well acquainted with the Preds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll share probably the biggest thing I learned when I started to follow the game more closely, and that's the importance and nuances of the different zones.  (I copied the 2 definitions from a post by topshelf)

 

"Offside" is called when any player of the team that is moving the puck toward the opposing goaltender crosses the blue line BEFORE the puck does. That's true even if the puck-carrier himself gets turned around and happens to drag the puck into the offensive zone after his skates are in (although that particular occurrence is pretty rare). Offside doesn't result in a player doing time in the penalty box, just a face-off outside the blue line where the infraction occurred.

 

"Icing" is when a player sends the puck from the side of the center (red) line that he is defending all the way down the ice, without it being touched by any player on either team. No penalty, but in this case the face-off comes all the way back to the offending team's end of the rink, and the offending team is not permitted to change any players until the face-off has occurred. This gives the other team a slight advantage, b/c they get to put fresh troops out with a chance to control the puck in the offensive zone.

 

It was only when I began following the Canes regularly that I gained an appreciation of how important it is for the team on defense to clear the puck from their own end without Icing it (or, conversely, for the team on offense to keep the puck in their own end when the defense is trying to clear it).  Because of the Offside rule, if the team on defense sends the puck back to the other side of their blue line, everybody on the offensive team has to retreat back beyond that blue line into the neutral center zone before they can attack again.  It makes the opposition completely restart their attack and relieves pressure when a team is attacking on offense.   

 

I also came to appreciate how important it is to get the puck into your opponents defensive zone without going Offsides, and the "mini battles" at the blue line to make it/ prevent it from happening.  There are times when a team carries the puck into their offensive zone and immediately scores (usually on "breakaways"), but more often than not it's kind of a two part process.  First, gain entry into your offensive zone and then eventually score the goal.  Deny the opposition entry into your defensive zone and they're not going to score.  

 

During my years of very casually watching I never really appreciated the importance and nuances of the different hockey zones and it added greatly to my enjoyment of the game once I did.

 

Welcome to the boards and hopefully a satisfying future as a full fledged Caniac!

Edited by LakeLivin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome Concord. A lot of our great members will give you all kinds of great thoughts like Lake just did, on watching hockey, the only game where the action is so fast and intense that you have to change players during play. 

 

One great way to enhance your understanding and appreciation of the game is to lurk here on these boards, and even pitch in a post here and there. We may not be experts to the degree we imagine ourselves but a lot of great insights are offered as well as links to interesting stats and articles. And occasionally a laugh or two.

 

 

Edited by remkin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Concord, welcome.

 

First and foremost, thanks for choosing the Canes and not those lousy Preds! :D

 

It sounds like you've watched hockey on TV; have you been to a game in person? Now before you think I'm working for the Canes' box office, there is nothing like a live game to fully appreciate the speed. It also makes following hockey on TV much easier. I've always believed that if it were possible for the NHL to give everybody one free ticket to a game, hockey would give football and every other sport a run for their money, because the number-one complaint people have about hockey is that it's too hard to follow on TV. Once you've been to a game live, following on TV becomes much easier. So that would be my first suggestion: Get to a live game. Sit near center ice, either at the top of lower bowl or the bottom of the top bowl, which is about where TV cameras are placed.

 

Once you get the hang of following the puck, the next thing is learning to anticipate plays. It's what the best players are great at doing, and as a fan, if you can look a bit ahead of the puck for what might happen next, you'll quickly get up to speed with how both offense and defensive countermeasures develop. You'll also spot high-percentage scoring opportunities.

 

Finally, look for numerical mismatches. Power plays (when one team has a guy in the box) are obvious, but at even strength (much like basketball) hockey is a game where the team with the numbers on any given play - and where the players who are able to shake loose of coverage - are going to have the greatest impact.

 

Welcome aboard! 

Edited by top-shelf-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...