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The Lighter Side of Lockdown

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1 hour ago, top-shelf-1 said:

Nice! I got to work with bubinga a lot as a young man, when I prototyped a new line that featured it for a small limited-run manufacturer.

 

Years after starting my own shop, I "taught" (<= quotes explained momentarily) a woodworking class at an adult evening school for a few semesters. The day of the first class, I'm in my shop and it dawns on me: "What if somebody wants me to demonstrate... oh, I don't know, hand-cut dovetails?? Yipes!" There'd been zero call for them in my work (mostly commercial and institutional cabinetry), but in what I thought would be an instructional setting, who knew? So to be sure I remembered how to do them, I made what eventually became the mahogany apron of the table below (top and legs are maple).

 943113590_MahogMapleEndTable.thumb.jpg.591dcafe1c81bf7a2e5f676a9d749624.jpg

Of course, nobody asked. The "class" was guys who'd been coming for years, each with a new project every semester, and painstakingly detailed progress notes, so they'd be sure to get the time they needed on given pieces of equipment in given weeks, to keep their projects on schedule (Christmas gifts each fall, graduation gifts each spring). Great group of people, and I wasn't totally useless, probably saving them a finger or two by virtue of timely interventions: "Whoa, there... let's think about a safer way to do this..."

I once took a one 3 Dimensional Wood Design class at Cal State Northridge (only class I ever took there).  The teacher challenged us to take a man made object and blow it up in wood.  The results were later displayed in an art gallery at Cal State Long Beach.  About 5 years later, having moved back to CT and become a Whalers fan again, I made the tripod that the camera (based upon my Pentax ME Super) sits on.  There are the biggest hand dovetails I have ever made.

fullsizeoutput_949.jpeg

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I just wish I could build a decent looking bookshelf needless to say anything close to the talented stuff y’all are putting out.

 

my avatar is my typical face when I finish some woodworking project.

Edited by gocanes0506
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At the expense of myself to give ya'll a chuckle, I've only worked with hand tools a few times and I'm just terrible at it. 

 

In College, I had a theatre class and we all got to be stage hands as a project. I dunno anything about hand held saws, what their real name is but this saw could cut along curved edges. I'm cutting along, not a care in the world although... wondering why it's such a pain in the *edit* to keep the saw moving until the table collapses under me.

 

I forgot the damn thing was on a table. They didn't let me touch the saw again. 

Edited by legend-1
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54 minutes ago, legend-1 said:

I forgot the damn thing was on a table. They didn't let me touch the saw again. 

Least you did not cut through the saw cord.(Been there done that) LOL

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As long as we're displaying our woodworking skills I figured I'd jump in.  I needed something to prop up an uneven planter box hanging on my rail.  I made this board using a circular saw and a longer board.  To make this board I used wood. 

 

dzHfz9mVTVN59wD9lQyji4dQgdvhk0jVc_tKHhhN-rwbQUliFwnR_X3bm3JE4pPil4QO_oWDz8oJ2hwLGSfuBj9TH9cNjXO7KiLx-CU53yZ7tuEu3KPoQglbRPiys9Qqcp1aEdpQShPKqHs4XCBiwk54mQ.thumb.jpg.a5d71db6c5b6b50cf1ca5eecf1e195ef.jpg

 

While understandably proud of my own work, If I'm being completely honest I'm a tad jealous of some of the items you guys have made.    

Edited by LakeLivin
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13 hours ago, top-shelf-1 said:

Nice! I got to work with bubinga a lot as a young man, when I prototyped a new line that featured it for a small limited-run manufacturer.

 

Years after starting my own shop, I "taught" (<= quotes explained momentarily) a woodworking class at an adult evening school for a few semesters. The day of the first class, I'm in my shop and it dawns on me: "What if somebody wants me to demonstrate... oh, I don't know, hand-cut dovetails?? Yipes!" There'd been zero call for them in my work (mostly commercial and institutional cabinetry), but in what I thought would be an instructional setting, who knew? So to be sure I remembered how to do them, I made what eventually became the mahogany apron of the table below (top and legs are maple).

 943113590_MahogMapleEndTable.thumb.jpg.591dcafe1c81bf7a2e5f676a9d749624.jpg

Of course, nobody asked. The "class" was guys who'd been coming for years, each with a new project every semester, and painstakingly detailed progress notes, so they'd be sure to get the time they needed on given pieces of equipment in given weeks, to keep their projects on schedule (Christmas gifts each fall, graduation gifts each spring). Great group of people, and I wasn't totally useless, probably saving them a finger or two by virtue of timely interventions: "Whoa, there... let's think about a safer way to do this..."

I also taught an adult education woodworking class for about 3 years in a suburb of Hartford, CT, South Windsor.  Coming from a professional background where I have seen several experienced craftsmen lose digits around shapers and table saws mostly, I stressed safety around the equipment and probably didn't let any of the students cut their own work for the first few sessions.  These were always night classes, and well before the age of cellular phones.  I am most proud of the fact that none of the students got injured over the course of those 3 years.

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9 hours ago, LakeLivin said:

As long as we're displaying our woodworking skills I figured I'd jump in.  I needed something to prop up an uneven planter box hanging on my rail.  I made this using a circular saw.  Yellow pine was my wood of choice.  

 

dzHfz9mVTVN59wD9lQyji4dQgdvhk0jVc_tKHhhN-rwbQUliFwnR_X3bm3JE4pPil4QO_oWDz8oJ2hwLGSfuBj9TH9cNjXO7KiLx-CU53yZ7tuEu3KPoQglbRPiys9Qqcp1aEdpQShPKqHs4XCBiwk54mQ.thumb.jpg.a5d71db6c5b6b50cf1ca5eecf1e195ef.jpg

 

While understandably proud of my own work, If I'm being completely honest I'm just a tad jealous of some of the items you guys have made.    

Gorgeous! (I refer to the railing in the background :) ). 

 

One of the first columns I ever read by Dave Barry seems appropriate here.

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2 hours ago, beboplar said:

These were always night classes, and well before the age of cellular phones.  I am most proud of the fact that none of the students got injured over the course of those 3 years.

Exactly. I enjoyed the same good fortune in the same era, but the school eventually abandoned the class when its insurer raised their rates so high that the course fee would have been ridiculous.

 

I love the camera! Very cool. 

 

Here's my latest. Cherry and maple. The ends of the legs are exposed within the top, and the shelf lifts out for easy vacuuming. It's based on an oak dining table I made over thirty years ago, for a guy who (little did I know) would later become my cardiologist. (It was a minor heart attack, but I became symptomatic [how's this for bringing the conversation full circle?] on my way to play floor hockey!)

CherryMapleGlassEnd.thumb.jpg.9c7cdbd12edaf3337d1c008be2955bdf.jpg

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8 hours ago, top-shelf-1 said:

Gorgeous! (I refer to the railing in the background :) ). 

 

One of the first columns I ever read by Dave Barry seems appropriate here.

I read the column by Dave Barry.   This is very funny stuff.  

 

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8 hours ago, top-shelf-1 said:

Exactly. I enjoyed the same good fortune in the same era, but the school eventually abandoned the class when its insurer raised their rates so high that the course fee would have been ridiculous.

 

I love the camera! Very cool. 

 

Here's my latest. Cherry and maple. The ends of the legs are exposed within the top, and the shelf lifts out for easy vacuuming. It's based on an oak dining table I made over thirty years ago, for a guy who (little did I know) would later become my cardiologist. (It was a minor heart attack, but I became symptomatic [how's this for bringing the conversation full circle?] on my way to play floor hockey!)

CherryMapleGlassEnd.thumb.jpg.9c7cdbd12edaf3337d1c008be2955bdf.jpg

I like the design of the legs, very Art Deco.  I am curious about the top;  with the type of joinery and it being all solids, will it end up cracking from expansion and contraction?  Does it get humid in your neck of the woods?  I can appreciate it took some work, so I applaud.

 

If you liked the camera, you may like this Swiss Army knife.

fullsizeoutput_627.jpeg

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On 4/15/2020 at 10:35 AM, cc said:

At least I aint gotten to wiping my butt with a wash cloth yet. Thats a plus.

All I know (and I mean that literally, b/c I'm hearing it several times daily) is that Mrs. Shelf wants a Bidet Buddy, and has me pretty much convinced.

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2 hours ago, beboplar said:

I like the design of the legs, very Art Deco.  I am curious about the top;  with the type of joinery and it being all solids, will it end up cracking from expansion and contraction?  Does it get humid in your neck of the woods?  I can appreciate it took some work, so I applaud.

 

If you liked the camera, you may like this Swiss Army knife.

fullsizeoutput_627.jpeg

Looks like somebody took their instructor's "blow it up" challenge to the limit! That is super cool!

 

It is humid here, but I'm not worried about cracking. Each strip of the top is glued to the last, with the flat-sawn faces vertical. It's basically a horizontal stack lam with each "course" glued on edge from the inside out, working around the table one course at a time. I glue and clamp each piece in place for flushness, then staple and keep going, allowing the work to continue until complete (typically 2-3 hours). 

 

First I mill everything up, cut each strip to rough length, stage them so I'll be sure to grab them in the proper sequence, and trim them for an exact fit as I go. My starter is a piece of plywood, where the glass will go, cut just smidge bigger than the glass in both width and length so the glass will drop right onto small supports glued to the innermost course once the main piece is assembled.

 

The (oak) dining table I did this way originally is now more than 30 years old, also in a humid environment, and no issues. Of course, it's got much more wood--it's 45 x 78 with a central opening of 15 x 48. Gluing edge-up the key; as you know, flat-sliced lumber expands a lot more across the face grain than within its thickness (and on an inch-and-a-quarter face, like these strips, even face movement is negligible). By laminating edge-up, I negate seasonal movement almost completely, and there's a nice bonus: that tight edge grain makes for a super-durable top.  

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On 4/16/2020 at 5:49 AM, Red_Storm said:

Interesting stuff, KJUNKANE.  Were you a fan of Quincy, M.E. back in the day? 📺🤔 I was always amused by the opening credits of that show when Quincy pulled the sheet off the corpse and began the autopsy in front of a row of rookie cops and all the cops pass out one by one!

Just getting back to you, as spent the day with law enforcement recovering a body ironically (can read about in news). At any rate, yes my favorite show for years. Have the entire series on video someone gifted me.

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1 hour ago, KJUNKANE said:

Just getting back to you, as spent the day with law enforcement recovering a body ironically (can read about in news). At any rate, yes my favorite show for years. Have the entire series on video someone gifted me.

Checked the news, yes, you’ve been busy...

I recall the show fondly but it’s probably been twenty years since I’ve seen an episode when it was in syndication.

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8 hours ago, top-shelf-1 said:

Looks like somebody took their instructor's "blow it up" challenge to the limit! That is super cool!

 

It is humid here, but I'm not worried about cracking. Each strip of the top is glued to the last, with the flat-sawn faces vertical. It's basically a horizontal stack lam with each "course" glued on edge from the inside out, working around the table one course at a time. I glue and clamp each piece in place for flushness, then staple and keep going, allowing the work to continue until complete (typically 2-3 hours). 

 

First I mill everything up, cut each strip to rough length, stage them so I'll be sure to grab them in the proper sequence, and trim them for an exact fit as I go. My starter is a piece of plywood, where the glass will go, cut just smidge bigger than the glass in both width and length so the glass will drop right onto small supports glued to the innermost course once the main piece is assembled.

 

The (oak) dining table I did this way originally is now more than 30 years old, also in a humid environment, and no issues. Of course, it's got much more wood--it's 45 x 78 with a central opening of 15 x 48. Gluing edge-up the key; as you know, flat-sliced lumber expands a lot more across the face grain than within its thickness (and on an inch-and-a-quarter face, like these strips, even face movement is negligible). By laminating edge-up, I negate seasonal movement almost completely, and there's a nice bonus: that tight edge grain makes for a super-durable top.  

It's been 40 years since I took that class, and I can't recall anything about the instructor, EXCEPT he took us on a field trip to the home and shop of Sam Maloof in Alta Loma and we were given a tour by the master himself.  I can still visualize stacks of rocker parts laying all over his Unisaw, and his two trusted apprentices working away on rockers.  Even then, he had a 4 year waiting list.  

 

Let me offer another piece.  Back in 1962 I collected the complete Topps baseball set.  It sat in a cardboard box for close to 40 years, until I built this custom display case for it.  Enjoy.

fullsizeoutput_621.jpeg

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11 hours ago, beboplar said:

It's been 40 years since I took that class, and I can't recall anything about the instructor, EXCEPT he took us on a field trip to the home and shop of Sam Maloof in Alta Loma and we were given a tour by the master himself.  I can still visualize stacks of rocker parts laying all over his Unisaw, and his two trusted apprentices working away on rockers.  Even then, he had a 4 year waiting list.  

 

Let me offer another piece.  Back in 1962 I collected the complete Topps baseball set.  It sat in a cardboard box for close to 40 years, until I built this custom display case for it.  Enjoy.

fullsizeoutput_621.jpeg

Kewl. I have a prospective project right now for a lady who collects fountain pens. We're talking about a shallow rectangle top with stylized pens as the front legs.

 

Maloof, Krenov, Frid, Nakashima... there are aren't guys left like them. Wharton Esherick was another, whose home near Valley Forge was made into a museum after his passing.   

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On 4/15/2020 at 10:35 AM, cc said:

  Lack of income is better than having this disease.  

So this disease is not overblown or a crock of crap?

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37 minutes ago, top-shelf-1 said:

Kewl. I have a prospective project right now for a lady who collects fountain pens. We're talking about a shallow rectangle top with stylized pens as the front legs.

 

Maloof, Krenov, Frid, Nakashima... there are aren't guys left like them. Wharton Esherick was another, whose home near Valley Forge was made into a museum after his passing.   

I owe my passion for woodworking to two parties:

 

1) Working as a VISTA Volunteer doing business consulting to Native American artisans for a year, observing the joy they got from working with their hands.

 

2) Two books I read by James Krenov, inspiring prospective woodworkers with his soulful outlook.  

 

I've made two lamp tables that are Nakashima knockoffs.  The swiss army knife base is also a Nakashima knockoff.  Probably everything else I have designed is original.  OK for today's offering I give you a bentwood globe stand that has survived since building it in a 1 car garage shop in Santa Monica in 1982.

fullsizeoutput_628.jpeg

Edited by beboplar
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On 4/16/2020 at 4:16 PM, LakeLivin said:

As long as we're displaying our woodworking skills I figured I'd jump in.  I needed something to prop up an uneven planter box hanging on my rail.  I made this board using a circular saw and a longer board.  To make this board I used wood. 

 

dzHfz9mVTVN59wD9lQyji4dQgdvhk0jVc_tKHhhN-rwbQUliFwnR_X3bm3JE4pPil4QO_oWDz8oJ2hwLGSfuBj9TH9cNjXO7KiLx-CU53yZ7tuEu3KPoQglbRPiys9Qqcp1aEdpQShPKqHs4XCBiwk54mQ.thumb.jpg.a5d71db6c5b6b50cf1ca5eecf1e195ef.jpg

 

While understandably proud of my own work, If I'm being completely honest I'm a tad jealous of some of the items you guys have made.    

 

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1 hour ago, slapshot02 said:

So this disease is not overblown or a crock of crap?

This is lighter side? Lol

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1 hour ago, slapshot02 said:

So this disease is not overblown or a crock of crap?

No, but apparently that's one of the symptoms now? Unbelievable how it's appearing to involve multiple organs, quite unlike the specificity we see with most viruses. Not sure what to make of this, as still in very early stage of scrutiny, so might be an unrelated byproduct of SARS-CO 2 and not direct damage by the virion on heart, liver and kidneys, like it damages certain cells in the lungs?

Edited by KJUNKANE

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Well if you want my take in 10,000 words or less it's in the covid section. It is both overblown AND very serious at the same time is my opinion. Is that a lighter statement? Borderline probably. 

 

But yes, ideally this thread can stay lighter. 

 

image.png

 

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6 hours ago, beboplar said:

I owe my passion for woodworking to two parties:

 

1) Working as a VISTA Volunteer doing business consulting to Native American artisans for a year, observing the joy they got from working with their hands.

 

2) Two books I read by James Krenov, inspiring prospective woodworkers with his soulful outlook.  

 

I've made two lamp tables that are Nakashima knockoffs.  The swiss army knife base is also a Nakashima knockoff.  Probably everything else I have designed is original.  OK for today's offering I give you a bentwood globe stand that has survived since building it in a 1 car garage shop in Santa Monica in 1982.

Mine was my brother, who is 14 years older than me. I served an indentured servitude as a sander one summer in his north Jersey shop and when the job was done and delivered gave me a beer. If this was woodworking, I was down. I grew up 20 miles form Nakashima's shop but have never thought of him as an influence, though he clearly was on my bro. So was Frid, who was my other influence, thanks to one of his three-book series, which my brother gave me for a birthday in my early 20s, after I'd begun my (informal) internship for that mfg I mentioned way back upthread.

 

I've knocked off Frid. My biggest handcut dovetails are at the back/seat joint of these stools, where the stock is over an inch thick:

FridStools.thumb.jpg.39b65b9680d9e85e3200b7d114de8115.jpg

 

I've always found stools challenging because when they are sturdy-looking enough (to my eye) they also look clunky, and I hate clunky. These are not clunky, but (inevitably) they are also not up to my standard of sturdiness. Which is surprising, b/c Frid was a man of generous proportion. He conceived these after sitting on a split-rail fence all day at a horse show and noticing he was never uncomfortable. Maybe he incorporated the bounce one gets riding a fence into these subconsciously, I don't know, but it's there.

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2 hours ago, top-shelf-1 said:

Mine was my brother, who is 14 years older than me. I served an indentured servitude as a sander one summer in his north Jersey shop and when the job was done and delivered gave me a beer. If this was woodworking, I was down. I grew up 20 miles form Nakashima's shop but have never thought of him as an influence, though he clearly was on my bro. So was Frid, who was my other influence, thanks to one of his three-book series, which my brother gave me for a birthday in my early 20s, after I'd begun my (informal) internship for that mfg I mentioned way back upthread.

 

I've knocked off Frid. My biggest handcut dovetails are at the back/seat joint of these stools, where the stock is over an inch thick:

FridStools.thumb.jpg.39b65b9680d9e85e3200b7d114de8115.jpg

 

I've always found stools challenging because when they are sturdy-looking enough (to my eye) they also look clunky, and I hate clunky. These are not clunky, but (inevitably) they are also not up to my standard of sturdiness. Which is surprising, b/c Frid was a man of generous proportion. He conceived these after sitting on a split-rail fence all day at a horse show and noticing he was never uncomfortable. Maybe he incorporated the bounce one gets riding a fence into these subconsciously, I don't know, but it's there.

I always believed "sand" was a 4 letter word.  I was making 6 contemporary Adirondack chairs out of Douglas Fir, based upon a design I'd seen in Sunset magazine many years ago.  My wife, who I was dating at the time, said she would love to help out sanding them with me.  Obviously, there was some code language being expressed there.  Translation, we will go down to the shop, and I will show you how I can sand (for a period not to exceed 5 minutes), and then you will take me out to dinner.  Funny me, I thought she was there to help me make in roads in the sanding task.

 

Obviously, your stools are very pretty.  Is there a not to exceed weight limit for users?  I made a stool once out of ash and walnut.  It is bulky compared to yours, but it has been knocking around here for 25 years.  Btw, those Adirondack chairs still sit in our back yard around the fire pit.

fullsizeoutput_94d.jpeg

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4 hours ago, remkin said:

Well if you want my take in 10,000 words or less it's in the covid section. It is both overblown AND very serious at the same time is my opinion. Is that a lighter statement? Borderline probably. 

 

But yes, ideally this thread can stay lighter. 

 

image.png

 

 

Helium?

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