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Next year on the goalie search   Im not sure where  Jesper  Wallstedt    will be   picked at in the draft   but it's assumed to be in the 1st round .    If only the canes could secure a way to pick  him then it  would be great   but i dont know if the canes will be close enough to pick  him in the first place .      As for next years   Goalies that are   ufa   There is Anderson  and Raanta 

And Binnington  .    But Carolina is in no position of  signing any of those  guys due to  some serious cap issues and players they need to re-sign .    

Edited by Canesfanforever

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10 minutes ago, realmdrakkar said:

 

 

Do you mean Nicolas Roy?  We traded him to Vegas before last season.  Or is there another Roy and i'm confused?

Yup Nic Roy. To me if we drafted them and they have a career we still drafted them even if we end up trading them. That part is about the pick. I consider Dumoulin one of our better picks. Should we have traded him for Staal? That's a different question!

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OK, not much going on. I'm going to recap my take on the draft one by one over time. I really think we killed this draft, especially in the first 4 rounds, and our last pick is a pretty good dart to throw. The highest end, biggest prize is our first pick:

 

Seth Jarvis: very high riser late. Has all of the offensive skills.

 

So, points-per-game in draft year is far from a guarantee to NHL success. It is, however, the single biggest metric that does. We talk skating, shot, puckskills, speed, size, defensive game, passing skills, etc etc, but in the end, proving that you can score tons of points against your age group (and really a couple of years older), in your draft year, is the biggest single thing. Over the years I've watched drafts closely, I've seen so many guys drafted for size or speed or some expected upside that did not actually score at an expected level in Juniors struggle or flame out in the NHL. Then guys like say Mitch Marner, who was small and not that fast really, but who just put up tons and tons of points in juniors his draft year, kill it in the NHL. 

 

Seth Jarvis has the marks there on speed, skating, hockey IQ, passing, shooting, defense, battling, going to the net, pretty much everything, but he is a smaller guy and didn't have that extreme sizzle in any one area that gets scouts juices flowing in terms of lottery pick guys. But he checks the basic scouting boxes in nearly every category. OK, good, but what he really did was score in bunches. And the last 26 days were of a historic amount.

 

Jarvis scored 1.69 ppg in the WHL for the full draft season, but what is tantalizing is that the last 26 games he scored 2.42 ppg. How does that compare in the history of the WHL? Well the WHL goes back a while. Records go back to he late 70's. This is relative because the highest single season ppg records are nearly all from the 80s and a few in the 90's. The other thing one has to keep in mind is that single season records are mostly set by guys in draft plus one or plus two, or older players. Jarvis did the 1.69/2.42 as a 17 year old, and in an era where there seems to be much less scoring than the 80's and 90's.

 

As one goes down the list of all time ppg, There are 18 players with 2.5 ppg or higher. But all of them are from the 70's and 80s. Not even one from the 90s'. Also, only one, Rob Brown, did it at 17 years old. Of players from 2000 on, only one was above 2.00 ppg, and that was Mike Comrie in exactly 2000 (so nearly 90's) and he did it at 20 years old.

 

If you look at the list of 17 year olds that lead the pack, only 3 got over 2.00 ppg, they were all in the early 80's and other than Brown's 2.5 season, they were 2.18 and 2.00 ppg. 

 

If you just go by most ppg by a 17 year old in WHL history, Jarvis is #18. Again that's his entire year, of 1.69 ppg. His 2.42 ppg would have been #2 by a 17 year old in the history of the WHL, and again, the other guy did it in the mid 80's when scoring was way up. 

 

Other notable players to have high ppg seasons at 17: Mike Modano 1.95, Patrick Marleau 1.76, Joe Sakic 1.84. Other notable players to have high ppg but did it older: Mark Stone 1.86 (19), Jordon Eberle 1.85 (19), Matt Barzal 1.92 (19), Sam Reinhardt 1.75 (19), Brayden Point 1.83 (19). Marc Recchi 1.90 (18). 

 

So, was the 2.42 a result of playing with a super star and tapping in goals? No. Jarvis created most of those points as primary driver. Was the 2.42 ppg an outlier, or did it bring his total for the year up artificially? The 2.42 ppg is probably somewhat a factor of a high shooting percentage, and that part may not be sustainable, but according to a couple of pretty detail-oriented youtube scouts, who watch a ton of players ridiculously close and lots of stats and advanced stats, they think that the 2.42 is closer to the truth than the first half of the year. One pointed out that he was generating tons of offense early too, but teammates were not cashing, and his own attempts not going in. 

 

There are no guarantees in the draft, but Jarvis not only has the insane production, but the scouts mostly all like him and many love him. Here's just one excerpt:

 

Almost every observer raves about Jarvis’s excellent hands. His passing ability and shooting ability are both phenomenal. Passing wise, he consistently delivers clean feeds, and he uses this ability often to help produce offense. As a shooter, Jarvis has a very accurate shot. This accuracy, combined with his quick release, makes him a real goal scoring threat offensively.

 

As a skater, Jarvis is very fast and he is also very agile. He moves side to side well, which helps him create space for himself. Jarvis is also an intelligent player, and he is able to use that intelligence and good vision to help open up the ice as well. 

 

And I'll add 3 more points: 1. He was #2 in the WHL in +/- at +53,  2. his coach said he was one of the best penalty killers in the league. And 3, Canes scouts think his hockey IQ is off the charts.

 

Again, no draftee is a guarantee of hitting his upside, but IMO Jarvis' upside is Brayden Point/Mitch Marner. If he hits that? Woa. 

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OK, one more quote from an interview with Jarvis' coach. After talking up his offensive skill and all of the good, he was asked:

 

Conversely, which areas of his game will need to improve? 

 

He doesn’t have many holes in his game. We’ve had a lot of players go on to the NHL level, and usually with those guys, there’s something in their game that I would say, “He’s got to really work on this.” For Seth, I think it’s just maturing and getting stronger. He’s going to play at 5-foot-11, six-feet, but he’s going to be strong. He’s going to be a thick guy … I don’t think it really matters how big he is height-wise.

But really, I don’t see any holes in his game. For what he’s done as a 17-year-old, he’s been as good as any 17-year-old we’ve had, and we’ve had quite a few first-rounders (over) the last 10 years.

 

(bold is me).

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So Seth Jarvis is the most likely to become a top 6 or better player for us. Further he has the least downside. Hence, pretty high first rounder. 

 

But after that, despite players having question marks, we largely kept going with the higher risk, higher reward, high-skill despite downsides model. 

 

Noel Gunler is the poster boy for tantalizingly high end skills, but with question marks. This guy has first round skill and probably mid-pack first round skill. He scored 1.48 ppg in the Swedish U20 Junior league. But what really jumped out was .87 goals per game. Yes that's goals per game. His talent is pretty uniformly agreed on by scouts. Four had him ranked #10. #11, #12 and #15 in the draft. But there is a big split when it comes to play away from the puck and puck battles, where he seemed to drift and not dig so much. His draft year he found himself in the SHL men's league where his coach scratched him early and didn't give him a lot of minutes. So, in low minutes, vs men, he didn't score much. Pronman was not a huge fan, but still mock drafted him to go #31, and listed him as the #1 best player available at the start of the second round, calling him "very talented". 

 

He did not get an early invite to Team Sweden last year. It is speculated because of the lack of trust in his play away from the puck. That said, the coach just said that they didn't have room in their top 6 and Gunler was not really a bottom 6 guy on that team. He is predicted by Wheeler to make this year's team and likely play on their second line and as he put it, "In Gunler's case, I think he is capable of being a real star in this tournament." He has very good hockey sense, great hands, very good passer and a very hard, accurate shot. This year's U20 WJT coach said of him, "He can put pucks in the net and he can make plays, he has great hockey sense.”

 

Gunler probably needs 2+ years of development to figure out the entire game and not just play offense with and around the puck. But his SHL coach said he matured a lot last year, and is playing a "pro" game. He has risk, but If he figures out the play away from the puck and battles more to get ice time, he has top 6 potential. Very good for a second round pick. 

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16 hours ago, Canesfanforever said:

I cant wait till you get get to Ponomarev and Pashin   @remkin .

TBH it was looking into Ponomarev that gave me the itch to do this series. I had focused 99% of my energy on potential first round picks. Gunler fit because he was widely projected for the first round. But Ponomorev was the first name that I had to start from scratch. 

 

Vasily Ponomarev: Pick #53 in second round. It's funny because we've picked a few short guys, and for some reason I keep wanting to think Ponomarev is another one. Well now I know why. Looking around at different scouting reports he's listed as 5'10", 5'11" and 6'0". He doesn't look diminutive on the ice, so I'm going with closer to 6'0". Not that it matters much these days, but over the last couple of years the draft overall, and ours too, has gone pretty short with many picks. 

 

Anyways, what got me excited was watching his clips on youtube. This is a skilled player. He will be on display for team Russia at the World Junior Tourney, as hopefully will several of our prospects. He produced well on all U18 Russia Tourneys. What he did not do was put up dazzling draft year numbers when he came over to the Q last year. Most likely this is why he dropped to late second round. 

 

So Ponomarev is, in a way, the opposite story of Jarvis, where Jarvis both looks the part and destroyed the net, Ponomarev looks every bit the part, but did not produce in the Q as expected. So Ponomarev is drafted on his international production and the apparent talent one sees watching him play. And there is a lot of it. 

 

This was Pronman's take: (Pronman says he's 5'10". Someone needs to do a formal height measurement):

 

Ponomarev was one of the draft-eligible players I struggled with the most this past season. I think he’s one of the most talented players in the draft. There were about ten moments I can recall from watching him this past season where he made truly elite plays, plays that screamed top-six caliber NHL forward. He has high-end skill, and tremendous ability to improvise with his playmaking and ability to find his teammates. When those types of players don’t usually produce they are labeled as “he doesn’t compete,” but that is not the case with Ponomarev. He works hard, he kills penalties and most scouts praise his compete level. His skating is just fine. I think it’s good enough, he can slip away from checks but his skating does lack explosiveness, especially for a 5-foot-10 player. It’s hard to equate what my eyes have seen with a sub-point-per-game player in the Q. I think there’s a lot of talent, and he has a track record of producing at various levels and tournaments over many years, so it makes me believe in the player, but an uneasy belief.

 

Personally at #53, this is what we've been looking for. This is a very high talent, high energy guy. While I do like going with guys who have produced, late in the second round, this is a good guy to bet on, and he's done well for Team Russia. Maybe there has been a bit of an adjustment period coming over to Canada. If he put up big numbers in the Q, he'd be going in the first round. At .86 ppg, it's not like he didn't do anything, but the Q is a defense-last league, and so it's not quite there. Again though, this is why he was available. 

 

The Canes draft approach has been to go max talent available at the pick with a huge nod to upside. We are not trying to find bottom 6 forwards. We are swinging for top 6 guys over and over: Rees, Drury (IMO), Puistola, Suzuki, Jarvis, Gunler, even Tieksola and yes, Ponomarev and a couple of guys further down this draft too. Also in our trades (Bokk, Keane). I love this approach. We can go find third and fourth liners in trades and UFA. Swing at skill. You only need to connect a couple of times outside of the first round and there you are. 

 

Steve Kouminanos from The Draft Analysts wrote of Pono:   "Ponomaryov is a strong stickhandler with multiple fakes and spin moves that he times with precision, both in open ice and tight spaces. He’s a possession driver with very good speed and excellent balance, and much like Amirov, he can create chances using crisp cross-ice passes — forehand or backhand — while operating off the cycle. "

 

Ponomarev will be a guy to watch. There seems to be a ton of skill, and he battles and often wins. We just need to see the numbers start to follow. I expect him to have a breakout year in the Q, and WJC. If so, this could be, like Gunler, a steal. His skill says "NHL". And the way he battles and forechecks (and kills penalties) can cash that ticket to get him a look here. At this point, like Gunler, he's more of a project than say Jarvis, but this player is yet another very nice dart to throw that the board. I will be very interested in watching him develop. 

 

BTW Pronman gave our organizational depth #6 (post draft, no change) and already has Ponomarev as our #8 best prospect, or #6 if you exclude Svech and Necas.

 

1. Andrei Svechnikov, RW
2. Martin Necas, RW
3. Seth Jarvis, C/RW
4. Jake Bean, D
5. Ryan Suzuki, C
6. Noel Gunler, RW
7. Dominik Bokk, RW
8. Vasili Ponomaryov, C

 

 

Also notable that Pronman already has Jarvis in the 3 slot, which is effectively #1 for what IMO are really true "prospects", that is have not proven themselves in the NHL already. Essentially, of the players not currently in the NHL, Jarvis is our top prospect, even ahead of Suzuki and Bean. 

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So we've drafted the vast majority of these guys so I'll finish his list of our prospects Pronman-ranked here:

 

9. Morgan Geekie, C
10. Jamieson Rees, C
11. Patrik Puistola, LW
12. Anttoni Honka, D
13. Joey Keane, D
14. David Cotton, LW
15. Alexander Pashin, RW
16. Jack Drury, C

17. Zion Nybeck, LW

 

 

It is interesting that he has Pashin ahead of Drury, and Nybeck, from the lower end of this draft already on the list. 

 

I continue to think people (and Pronman) are short-selling Drury. You heard it here first. Well all of the other times I've said it too. Drury is not a lot of sizzle, but he's a lot of steak. He has NHL third line center written on him IMO, and could push that to second line if he keeps developing well.

 

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Alexander Nikishin: High 3rd round, #7 pick in 3rd: #69. 6'3" 196.

 

This is about where his average ranking settled, though he had a fairly high range with a couple liking him high second/low first, and some as low as the 4th round. 

 

The first thing that Canes fans might like about him is that he hits, hard. And open ice and through the chest, and takes people down. He is called "Boom" Nikishin for reason. He is big and physical. If he can find an NHL game, this is a guy like Edmundson but with bigger hits. 

 

If the physical was it though, he would not be worth a high third round pick. But IMO he has more. He is, like most big D men, a project. But watching his MHL highlights he has more offensive potential than some scouts see. It's hard to imagine serious offense, but not none. He is confident with the puck, plays solid position D and can remove the puck from forwards along the boards as well as hit them. He makes some very nice breakout passes too. 

 

Here are some scout quotes: "Quite good defender vs. the rush." "Closes gaps." "Thinks game well". Hands of a top line winger, puck seems glued to his stick allowing impressive dekes and zone exits and entries as well as all draft eligible players of all positions.". 

 

A 19 year old playing in the KHL on D is pretty impressive, even if it's bottom pair minutes. Watching his highlight reels from MHL and KHL shows skill. Enough skill IMO to mesh with an intimidating physical presence to really shut down opposing players. He'll clearly take time to develop as D men take longer, but doing so in the KHL could really get him up to speed relatively fast for a D man. 

 

Given our propensity to draft smaller players, this guy is a nice contrast. If he can get his NHL skills together, he can add a lot of snarl, grit, and, well "boom" to the Canes squad one day. 

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We went the other direction next round.

 

Zion Nybeck: LW. 4th round, #115 overall. He is listed as 5'6". Martin St Louis is 5'8" by comparison. Even Alex Debrincat is 5"7 ". But, the puck is on the ice, and there's no dunking in hockey.  Furthermore, Debrincat has fared pretty well in the NHL so far. OK, like so many players, his height seems to vary from source to source. He's been as tall as 5'8". I think the Canes mentioned him being 5'7". Either way, he is not a tall guy.

 

So, if you're going to try for the NHL and you're 5'6", you better be quick and have serious skills. Nybeck is and does.

 

He led all skaters in Sweden's Junior League with 66 points in 42 games, for 1.48 ppg last year, and was named Best Forward the year before. In Sweden's Junior u18 team he scored 10P 6G in just 4 games, and the previous year 17 goals and 24 points in only 14 games. 

 

And despite his size he's in the SHL now. OK no points yet, but the SHL does not throw these young'uns into big minutes or PP time.

 

A quick take: SCOUTING REPORT: MOBILE, QUICK PLAYMAKER WHO PLAYS BIGGER THAN HIS SIZE. COMPENSATES LACK OF SIZE AND STRENGTH WITH SPEED, PUCK-HANDLING, PASSING AND HOCKEY IQ. Reportedly plays a game similar to Mathew Barzal. That would be pretty impressive.

 

and this;

 

He’s an excellent passer and shooter who can play virtually any power play position. He’s dangerous to leave alone, as he can fire one-timers off in the blink of an eye. He’s also dangerous with the puck, which makes him a looming threat every time he’s on the ice.

 

He's been ranked as high as 37th (Future considerations), 24th (Josh Bell's Top 124). and 32nd (Larry Fisher's Top 400).

 

Pronman:  has a ton of skill. When you watch him with the puck, his ability to dangle clearly stands out. He also has excellent vision and is very dangerous off the perimeter....I think he’s a good skater, but it’s clearly more elusiveness than explosiveness in his stride. He’s my type of player, so I could see him be a third/fourth-line player for a coach willing to play this style of player in that role, but I get that he won’t be for everyone. I do think that he competes well, but it’s not his selling point. I respect his track record, especially at the club level over the years, but he’s going to be hard-pressed to become a scorer in the league without an extra step.

 

I see this as more of the taking an upside swing on a guy with a ton of skill, but small. Pronman likes him, but doesn't think he has a quick enough step. 

 

I come back to the production metric. Yes, there are many players who dominated younger leagues and never hit it in the NHL. But this is a 4th round pick for crying out loud. That is worth swinging on a guy who dominated his age group in Sweden for two years running and in international play. Those pucks did not put themselves in the net.

 

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Lucas Mercuri, our 6th rounder at 156, is more difficult to know about. Just not too much info on him out prep school. Big: 6'3" 201. From Montreal. 

 

Pronman's take: 

Mercuri has good skill and size, but he isn’t dynamic with the puck and scouts question his skating. 

 

And that's his entire take. 

 

Elite Prospects: 

He has a solid understanding of developing plays and teammate positions. He did his best offensive work down low, swinging the puck into the slot. -EliteProspects 2020 NHL Draft Guide 

 

The Canes Yorke obviously liked him more than the more well-known Pashin who we took in the 7th round and said:

 

"Another smart player who can transition the puck. To have the hands he has at 6-3 is pretty impressive. … It's another player who has that hockey sense."

 

I'm going with sort of a David Cotton type player maybe. Time will tell. Need to find out more about him.

 

He's going to U. Vermont, so try to follow his NCAA numbers. 

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Ponomarev   is interesting to me  .    He  has a 200 foot game   so he is solid in his  two way forward  style of  hockey .    Which would  explain why he is not scoring as much as expected  since the Qmjhl  Abandons  defense  and players  center focus mostly on  just offense ,    Ponomarev will  back check  and do what is required of  him to play some defense  .    His offensive side to his game  is pretty decent also .   I have  no doubt  that  the road for his development  will take some time  but  where he really impressed me  is  when it comes to big games  , tourneys  and such .  The kid just shines .

Edited by Canesfanforever

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Not sure anyone cares about these, but I'm almost done so....

 

Even though he was taken a few picks ahead, I'll save Pashin for last.

 

 Ronan Seeley:  7th Round: #206: Our last pick. 6-0 175, LHD

 

Simply put this is a bet on a fast, smooth skater with a nice D zone game to develop enough O to be serviceable. Believe it our not, PPG in juniors is also the best indicator for D men to make the NHL. If I recall the odds drop below about .75 ppg. Seeley put up .51 ppg his draft year. So, his odds are lower. But then, he was the #206 pick in the 7th round. And given that, he does seem to be a good bet that far down. 

 

One qualifier though: he's quite young for his draft group with an Aug 2 birthday. In some respects his draft year is almost next year. If he puts up a bunch of offense this year in Juniors, his chances certainly improve.

 

Yorke:  "Extremely fast skater. Holds tight gaps and is able to jump up into the play. … He's able to play the style we love here in Carolina."

 

When I read his scouting reports, that comes out. "Outstanding Skater with high top end speed in both directions. Allows him to keep tight gaps and very hard to beat on the rush. Good vision. Good passer, And in true Canes' draft style: "smart, reads the play extremely well.". 

 

Downside is a poor shot from the point, and for a D man, he's not big. He's described as a "slick skating, puck moving mobile D man that the NHL is moving to." It is not crazy in the modern NHL to see D first guy who can move the puck and stick to forwards on the rush and has breakneck speed both forward and backwards could find a nice roll in the bottom half of an NHL D. 

 

Clearly as a 7th rounder, this is a long shot, but betting on a smart, fast, mobile both ways D man with good vision and passing, in the 7th round seems like a good bet.

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And finally our second to last pick, another guy with pretty high upside and a bit of a head-scratcher to have fallen this far. But also a head-scratcher that if were so surprised he fell, why not take him at #159? Did we like Mercuri that much? (BTW not a head-scratcher that he fell, but that he fell THIS far).

 

7th Round, No. 199: Alexander Pashin, RW, UFA 2 (Russia)

 

Yorke's take: "Not someone we expected to be there. Similar to Nybeck in terms of the high-end skill. … What's great about Alexander is he's able to take his game from the MHL and play it in the KHL. … He's still able to bring that high-end skill level while competing against men."

 

Pashin is another vertically underwhelming player at somewhere near 5'8". I'm sure that's part of his drop, but really a lot of short guys went a lot higher in this draft. 

 

Summation of scouting reports: EXPLOSIVE SPEEDSTER WITH OFFENSIVE INSTINCTS. SMALLISH FINESSE PLAYER WHO CREATES SCORING CHANCES WITH SPEED, SURPRISING MOVES AND GREAT STICKHANDLING. 

 

Pronman only knocked his size: He is a player who ticks a lot of the boxes you’re looking for in a skill set. Pashin has great hands. His small area play is high-end and he’s so tough to strip pucks off due to how slippery he is. That he can skate very well and make highly skilled plays in motion makes him very dangerous. Pashin is also a player who moves the puck and finishes plays, with his vision being more impressive between the two. He is tiny at 5-foot-8, but Pashin is a competitor who I’ve seen push much bigger players off pucks and kill penalties effectively.

 

More scouting reports; Undersized, Pashin is a dynamic skater. He has a lightning-quick first step and outstanding acceleration. Pashin wins races to loose pucks and is effective on the forecheck. He also has very good top-end speed. Pashin’s outstanding edge work and agility also help him to evade defenders both with and without the puck. He can turn on a dime and his lateral agility is excellent. His ability to change speeds is also a weapon that can fool defenders. Pashin has a low centre of gravity that improves his balance and helps him to fight for loose pucks.

 

Pashin also brings high-end skill into the equation. His hands are very good and he can make moves while skating at top-end speed. His ability to avoid defenders allows him to skate the puck through the neutral zone and create effective zone entries.

 

Pashin’s quick hands allow him to vary the angles and release points on that shot and fool goaltenders. His shot also has power. His snapshot and one-timer are also effective.

 

Pashin is also an excellent playmaker. He can set up teammates with the extra room he gets on the rush. He also can make a quick move to create a passing lane when he is cycling the puck or working off the boards. With excellent vision, he can find open linemates and make a pass through a tight area. He is very good at the saucer pass. Pashin chases loose pucks and is willing to fight for loose pucks 

 

His downsides from what I can tell, are his size. (he gets pushed off pucks, etc), and his defensive game, which appears to be a bit Skinner-like, and even in age-adjusted leagues, he's a defensive liability. So, he'll have to add what muscle he can to his small frame, learn to create tons of offense to offset his D liabilities and become at least not glaringly deficient on D. 

 

He's been called a boom or bust with upside of Gaudreau, but a small chance of hitting it. To me, these tiny players simply HAVE to be very high end on offense with high end production to make the NHL. Otherwise, what do they bring? They can ooze skill and still not really get a sniff, (remember the Smurf?). But again, 7th round. Pretty good time to put a bet on his number at the roulette wheel.

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So overall, at first evaluation, we crushed this draft when we adjust for the picks we had. Pronman gave us the 6th highest draft grade in this year's draft at B+. But every team ranked ahead of us had a top 7 pick. Yes NYR it's pretty easy to have a top draft when you win the lottery and get the no-brainer top pick. And so it went for a lot of the teams who draft graded ahead of us. Or tons of high picks "cough" Ottawa. 

 

Here's my cliff notes on our picks:

 

Jarvis, is, IMO a top 6 forward of the future with little chance of failing and frankly our best forward prospect since Svech. Pronman already has him as a our top prospect without NHL games, and I agree. Has the skill set in all aspects of the game that is so good, he makes it look ridiculously easy at the junior level. This is, IMO a good predictor that he will translate this to higher levels. 

 

Gunler is hit or miss guy projected for mid first round before dropping. But the hit seems higher than the miss. A project, but with tantalizing high end skill. 

Ponomarev is a guy with jump off the video skills, who is not big, and hasn't translated the skill to big Junior hockey points, but has in international play.

Nikishin is a teenager already playing KHL minutes on D. He hits like a train, but has more skill in transition than people think. *

Nybeck is they first of two uber high end skill set guys who can't ride the big roller coasters. He has put up massive points in age appropriate leagues.

Pashin is the other tiny tot. He's put up big points in international play, but not as much in Russia Juniors. Like Nybeck, quick and high end skills.

Mercuri is a decent sized center with good skill and IQ, but needs to improve skating and explosiveness. Watch him in NCAA this year at Vermont.

Seeley is a D man of average size who didn't score enough, but skates like the wind both directions, with high IQ, can move the puck, stick to forwards

 

*Nikishin dropped in part on health questions. My guess is that they are not significant though. We'll have to get more info. 

 

Every one of those players has NHL potential. Some, like Nybeck and Pashin will either be very productive or miss entirely. Some, like Mercuri and Seeley have very smooth, high IQ games who could surprisingly just slide right in. Others, Gunler and Ponomarev (and IMO Nikishin) have first round talent, but need to fix aspects. And one, Jarvis. Just needs to stay on track before lighting it up in the NHL. 

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On 11/13/2020 at 11:26 AM, remkin said:

And finally our second to last pick, another guy with pretty high upside and a bit of a head-scratcher to have fallen this far. But also a head-scratcher that if were so surprised he fell, why not take him at #159? Did we like Mercuri that much? (BTW not a head-scratcher that he fell, but that he fell THIS far).

 

7th Round, No. 199: Alexander Pashin, RW, UFA 2 (Russia)

 

Yorke's take: "Not someone we expected to be there. Similar to Nybeck in terms of the high-end skill. … What's great about Alexander is he's able to take his game from the MHL and play it in the KHL. … He's still able to bring that high-end skill level while competing against men."

 

Pashin is another vertically underwhelming player at somewhere near 5'8". I'm sure that's part of his drop, but really a lot of short guys went a lot higher in this draft. 

 

Summation of scouting reports: EXPLOSIVE SPEEDSTER WITH OFFENSIVE INSTINCTS. SMALLISH FINESSE PLAYER WHO CREATES SCORING CHANCES WITH SPEED, SURPRISING MOVES AND GREAT STICKHANDLING. 

 

Pronman only knocked his size: He is a player who ticks a lot of the boxes you’re looking for in a skill set. Pashin has great hands. His small area play is high-end and he’s so tough to strip pucks off due to how slippery he is. That he can skate very well and make highly skilled plays in motion makes him very dangerous. Pashin is also a player who moves the puck and finishes plays, with his vision being more impressive between the two. He is tiny at 5-foot-8, but Pashin is a competitor who I’ve seen push much bigger players off pucks and kill penalties effectively.

 

More scouting reports; Undersized, Pashin is a dynamic skater. He has a lightning-quick first step and outstanding acceleration. Pashin wins races to loose pucks and is effective on the forecheck. He also has very good top-end speed. Pashin’s outstanding edge work and agility also help him to evade defenders both with and without the puck. He can turn on a dime and his lateral agility is excellent. His ability to change speeds is also a weapon that can fool defenders. Pashin has a low centre of gravity that improves his balance and helps him to fight for loose pucks.

 

Pashin also brings high-end skill into the equation. His hands are very good and he can make moves while skating at top-end speed. His ability to avoid defenders allows him to skate the puck through the neutral zone and create effective zone entries.

 

Pashin’s quick hands allow him to vary the angles and release points on that shot and fool goaltenders. His shot also has power. His snapshot and one-timer are also effective.

 

Pashin is also an excellent playmaker. He can set up teammates with the extra room he gets on the rush. He also can make a quick move to create a passing lane when he is cycling the puck or working off the boards. With excellent vision, he can find open linemates and make a pass through a tight area. He is very good at the saucer pass. Pashin chases loose pucks and is willing to fight for loose pucks 

 

His downsides from what I can tell, are his size. (he gets pushed off pucks, etc), and his defensive game, which appears to be a bit Skinner-like, and even in age-adjusted leagues, he's a defensive liability. So, he'll have to add what muscle he can to his small frame, learn to create tons of offense to offset his D liabilities and become at least not glaringly deficient on D. 

 

He's been called a boom or bust with upside of Gaudreau, but a small chance of hitting it. To me, these tiny players simply HAVE to be very high end on offense with high end production to make the NHL. Otherwise, what do they bring? They can ooze skill and still not really get a sniff, (remember the Smurf?). But again, 7th round. Pretty good time to put a bet on his number at the roulette wheel.

I really hope Pashin is successful and makes it with the Canes. From what I can tell, he seems to be a lot like a guy named Sergey Tolchinsky. He had dynamite skills and looked great at camps. Too small and got pushed around a lot. I always was cheering for Sergey, but never got to be NHL or AHL material.

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Scouching guy on youtube liked our draft. He really likes Jarvis, but also Pashin and our shot at Gunler and Nikishin. Not as high on Pono or Nybeck or Mercuri. 

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