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On Pesce, I don't think that Asthma has turned out to be the risk factor in Covid that we assumed it would be. On the other hand, rushing him back from injury is another story.

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1 minute ago, remkin said:

On Pesce, I don't think that Asthma has turned out to be the risk factor in Covid that we assumed it would be. On the other hand, rushing him back from injury is another story.

 

Do you have a feel if that applies not just to contracting the disease, but also to potential long term lung damage if an asthmatic does contract covid-19?   

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7 minutes ago, LakeLivin said:

 

Do you have a feel if that applies not just to contracting the disease, but also to potential long term lung damage if an asthmatic does contract covid-19?   

Yes. I am particularly sensitive to this one as I have asthma and am exposed to Covid regularly. It is just natural to think that this would be a major risk factor for worse disease if one with asthma contracts covid. Turns out it isn't. One of the many surprises of Covid. The development of the covid pneumonia, and the severe inflammatory response, the two things that tend to spell badness, don't seem to be increased in asthmatics. It seems to be more correlated with vascular pathology as a more major risk factor. 

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Just now, remkin said:

Yes. I am particularly sensitive to this one as I have asthma and am exposed to Covid regularly. It is just natural to think that this would be a major risk factor for worse disease if one with asthma contracts covid. Turns out it isn't. One of the many surprises of Covid. The development of the covid pneumonia, and the severe inflammatory response, the two things that tend to spell badness, don't seem to be increased in asthmatics. It seems to be more correlated with vascular pathology as a more major factor. 

 

Ok, thanks Rem.

 

I suspect Pesce will still be tricky if he lags much behind the time others can start getting back into game shape. Clearly a 100% Pesce plays. But as gocanes said, it might come down to how well the rest of the D corps are doing.  How would a 70% game shape Pesce compare to a 100% TVR or Fleury (he has effectively been playing his off side, hasn't he?)?  Any chance a Chex right shot D (Kaskie, McKeown) might get enough of a look to factor into the playoffs?  (seems doubtful to me given how Brindy has used young players)    

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9 hours ago, remkin said:

Yes. I am particularly sensitive to this one as I have asthma and am exposed to Covid regularly. It is just natural to think that this would be a major risk factor for worse disease if one with asthma contracts covid. Turns out it isn't. One of the many surprises of Covid. The development of the covid pneumonia, and the severe inflammatory response, the two things that tend to spell badness, don't seem to be increased in asthmatics. It seems to be more correlated with vascular pathology as a more major risk factor. 

Much seems related to ACE-2 receptors so widespread in multiple organs, thus the question in my mind rem, is Does asthma increase the presence of the ACE-2 receptor? I suspect not, but frankly do not know? Possibly that could answer your quandary, meaning an asthmatic would not necessarily be at greater risk despite underlying lung disease?

Edited by KJUNKANE

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I'm not sure about the ACE-2 receptors in Asthma Kjun. I don't tend to see a huge correlation between asthma and hypertension, but that is just entirely garbage because it's just my top of the brain recollection from my practice. So...I did find this abstract. It's just an abstract, but surely suggests that there is no up regulation of the ACE-2 in allergic and asthmatic patients and they think it might actually be the opposite, leading to some protection.

 

Allergy, Asthma and COVID-19 Susceptibility

 

April 29, 2020 --

 

In a study published on April 22, 2020 in JACI, data from ITN’s CATEEC clinical trial was used to investigate the connection between asthma and allergic disease and the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19). The virus that leads to COVID-19, which has caused a global pandemic, uses the cell receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 (ACE2) to enter human cells and cause infection. Interestingly, while several underlying respiratory conditions have been identified as risk factors for developing COVID-19 illness, asthma and allergy has been unexpectedly underrepresented in early epidemiologic studies of severe COVID-19 illnesses. The authors of this manuscript utilized three recent allergy and asthma studies to determine whether ACE2 expression differs in those with allergy and asthma.

The ITN’s CATEEC study was designed to directly compare allergic responses to cat allergen delivered by environmental exposure chamber (EEC) or nasal allergen challenge (NAC) in order to better understand and employ these methods as allergy evaluation tools. Nasal epithelial cells were collected pre and post-allergen challenge as part of the study and were used in conjunction with airway epithelial cells from two other recent allergy and asthma clinical studies to investigate whether allergy and asthma are associated with reduced ACE2 expression. 

 

The CATEEC samples demonstrated a significant reduction in ACE2 expression following allergen challenge by both NAC and EEC. Similarly, in the Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA) study, participants who were more sensitive to allergen had lower ACE2 expression in nasal epithelial cells. The third study included adults with mild asthma who had significantly reduced ACE2 expression following allergen exposure in bronchial epithelial cells. 

 

This work demonstrates that allergy and allergen exposure both reduce expression of ACE2, which might reduce the risk of severe COVID-19 disease. Additional research investigating how allergic inflammation may regulate COVID-19 pathogenesis could identify new prevention and treatment approaches to more effectively control the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

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So really Pesce should be the first one out there! Just kidding. But I completely agree with not rushing him off the recovery part of it. There is no sense in that.

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Although Kakko has mild symptoms with Diabetes type 1, the Rangers are considering holding him out for the playoffs this season.

 

they don’t want to risk it.

Edited by gocanes0506

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Your citation above rem confirms what I'd thought in reading about the various co-morbidity factors at risk from a SARS-COV-2 infection, in the case of asthmatics, although I guess I (perhaps we) shouldn't rush too quickly to paint that broad picture as Asthma can be multifactorial can it not? Thus there might be some who could be vulnerable (not you I pray). But thanks for that reference rem.

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I Take it with all  unwarranted rioting in nhl cities  that they will be passed up on  as potential    " Hub cities "  for future play of  the nhl playoffs .   Just giving it a  Hunch ,   

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3 hours ago, KJUNKANE said:

Hmmmmm?

Yeah , unwarranted  .  no need for looting or rioting or burning things down .    I'm all for protesting peacefully  .   but not that other mess . 

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I think the NHL is using this season as a let’s try everything new.  I like the re-seeding idea. If everyone higher wins we would still get the Caps. if one of the 1-5 bows out we could be looking at the Pens or Flyers. While both are good teams, it would be less dirty.

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Gotta be able to handle the dirty. I dont see any distinction in this department for the 3 teams mentioned.

Edited by cc

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I like the re-seeding for this tourney for sure. If Montreal is going to win the cup, they'll have to face the gambit of the best non bye team, then each of the next best available teams all the way to the finals and then win that. 

 

I'm ok with re-seeding in the regular playoffs in the future. 

 

I am dead set against expanding the playoffs. Half the teams get in. That's enough. Adding another round for the play-in teams is one thing when everyone's been off for months, but at the end of a grueling season? The regular season has to mean something. 16 teams is more than enough IMO.

 

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22 hours ago, remkin said:

I am dead set against expanding the playoffs. Half the teams get in. That's enough. Adding another round for the play-in teams is one thing when everyone's been off for months, but at the end of a grueling season? The regular season has to mean something. 16 teams is more than enough IMO.

 

Yes.  The NHL was seen as a joke by many from the 80s through mid 90s because of the high number of teams entering the playoffs.  75% chance of entering the playoffs in the 80s.  Contrast MLB at about 15% chance.  Two extremes, both ridiculous.

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Listening to Adam Gold(ugh) on the way to work, and he mentioned that the Canes could have started practice this week, in small groups, but will not? Then have seen that Rangers will? That sounds a bit off, but I guess it's to stay safe.

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22 minutes ago, KJUNKANE said:

Listening to Adam Gold(ugh) on the way to work, and he mentioned that the Canes could have started practice this week, in small groups, but will not? Then have seen that Rangers will? That sounds a bit off, but I guess it's to stay safe.

I believe we only have 7 players in the area and they have skated with each other. We are waiting to hear when international players are to come back and how the league handles that.

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15 hours ago, gocanes0506 said:

I believe we only have 7 players in the area and they have skated with each other. We are waiting to hear when international players are to come back and how the league handles that.

That is what is stopping most teams.  Once they start practicing, they have to keep the same "cohort" together.  The cohorts are max group of 6.  Once you form the groups, they have to stay together.  No mixing the groups.

 

So...  The 7 here may not be appropriate to form a group of 6 due to bad balance of positions.  I would presume the Canes don't want to speak about these groups for competitive reasons.  Their right.

Edited by wxray1

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Listening a bit yesterday on XM also. I think that we have so many guys out of town or international, that the real key for them at this point is getting in shape and getting ice time somewhere. Once they get here and into the protocol, I think they might have to be tested daily and follow the entire protocol. Many guys will find it much nicer at this stage to stay put so long as they have figured out a way to get on the ice wherever they are. 

 

That said, we'll see this and next week. Some think that a lot of guys long for the "normalcy" of life at the rink with the boys and the structure, and might return just to get back at it.

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