Jump to content
The Official Site of the Carolina Hurricanes
Sign in to follow this  
GreatsavebyGerber

Wildfires, specifically Yorba Linda: now very close to home

Recommended Posts

Thank you, Saturn, for your concern. It's much appreciated. So far, I haven't had any police officers knocking on our door and ordering me to evacuate. Mr. G is working this weekend at Mills Ford in Anaheim; in case the fires jump the freeways any more, there's a possibility that he may have to stay at his office overnight. Let's see. :unsure:

To make matters worse, freeways have turned into bizarre chaos. For starters, drivers on the northbound 57/Santa Ana Freeway a few miles away from Carbon Canyon are likely to be stuck there for hours, while onramps onto that freeway have since been filled with a stream of drivers going the wrong way, turning off the freeway, and heading back onto side streets. (Thank goodness traffic is at a standstill there; if not for that, there'd be a mass onslaught of head-on collisions. :blink: ) The 91/Riverside Freeway is completely shut down: It's eerie to see a road you're very familiar as empty as a ghost town, save for the heavy smoke surrounding it.

Here's the most recent news regarding the wildfires:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-sy...0,4171399.story

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Saturday, Nov. 15

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FIRES BURN HUNDREDS OF HOMES; THOUSANDS THREATENED

Gov. declares a state of emergency in L.A. County. High winds drive flames through canyons in the San Fernando Valley, where 500 homes were destroyed. About 1,200 acres are scorched in O.C.

By Christopher Goffard, Louis Sahagun and Rich Connell

4:32 PM PST

As wildfires rage across Southern California this afternoon, emergency response shifted to Orange County, where thousands of residents were ordered evacuated, dozens of homes burned and a large apartment complex was in flames.

The community of Anaheim Hills was ordered to evacuate as a wind-driven blaze that began in nearby Riverside County swept through Yorba Linda and jumped the 91 Freeway.

In addition to the 91 Freeway, the fire had shutdown parts of the 241 tollway, where there were reports that some motorists had abandoned vehicles to escape thick smoke. A 250-unit apartment building in Anaheim Hills was engulfed in flames, and a separate fire closed part of the 57 Freeway near Brea, where homes also were reported destroyed. About 1,200 acres had been scorched in Orange County by late afternoon and towers of smoke and ash spread as far away as Long Beach. The losses in Anaheim Hills were still being tallied, but earlier, 12 homes were destroyed or damaged in Corona and as many as 20 burned in Yorba Linda.

Meanwhile, firefighters were still battling a massive fire in the northern San Fernando Valley, which prompted Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to declared a state of emergency in Los Angeles County.

The greatest damage in the Valley was reported in the Oakridge Mobile Home Park near Sylmar, where more than 500 homes were destroyed in the so-called Sayre blaze that started late Friday. Police sealed off the community and declared it a potential crime scene. Investigators were conducting a systematic search of the gutted homes, which were evacuated by police and firefighters just ahead of flames.

"My concern right now is this: Is everyone accounted for? Did everyone get out?" said Los Angeles Fire Capt. Steve Ruda. "We don't know."

Among those who lost everything at the mobile home park were Linda Pogacnik, 63, and Nodonda Baldwin, 56, retired Los Angeles Unified School District bus drivers who pooled their savings to buy a 1,500-square-foot mobile home.

Crying uncontrollably at a Sylmar High School shelter, Pogacnik said, "My street -- ashes. . . . It was a dream. We had a view, trees, a yard and neighbors. We felt so safe there. It was a perfect place for an old retired woman."

The Sylmar High evacuees were among 10,000 residents ordered from their homes as more than 1,000 firefighters used water-dropping helicopters, bulldozers and engines from across Southern California to try to halt the erratic march of the blaze as it hopscotched west and south toward thousands of homes.

That fire more than doubled in size today to 6,500 acres, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said at an early-afternoon briefing. "We've never lost in recent times anything close to this number" of homes, he said, referring to the mobile homes. The fire was 10% contained; officials hoped that the advance of the blaze into the previously burned area of last month's Sesnon fire would allow firefighters to get the upper hand.

But Los Angeles Deputy Fire Chief Mario Rueda added, "These are still very dangerous winds."

In addition, a fire that began Thursday night in Santa Barbara County, destroying more than 100 homes, was 40% contained this morning. Fire officials there warned that the Tea fire continued to threaten about 1,500 homes, and many neighborhoods remained under mandatory evacuation orders.

At the same time, the Sayre fire -- which began about 10:30 p.m. Friday in Sylmar -- had scorched more than 2,600 acres. Authorities had no estimate of when even partial containment could be expected.

The major traffic corridors converging near the Sayre fire -- the 5 and 210 freeways and California 14 -- were shut down as flames jumped the freeways.

On a day with warnings of extremely high fire danger and a forecast of low humidity and unusually high temperatures, the blazes stretched firefighting resources. In the San Fernando Valley, gusts up to 70 mph were driving horizontal flames through canyons and limiting the ability of large water-dropping planes to join the battle.

Villaraigosa declared a local emergency shortly before 8 a.m. Calling the winds "treacherous," the mayor warned that expected heat in the 90s combined with threats to power lines could cause significant interruptions to electrical service in the city.

"We may have to move to rolling blackouts," Villaraigosa said, pleading with residents to conserve energy.

About 600 firefighters were on the lines by early morning, and 18 aircraft were in use to fight the fire.

Only minor injuries were reported.

Towering columns of smoke spread across western Los Angeles County.

American Red Cross officials reported that 300 people had gone to the temporary shelter opened at Sylmar High School, 100 to John F. Kennedy High in Granada Hills and 71 to San Fernando High. Today an additional shelter was opened at Chatsworth High School.

Authorities this morning said three firefighters had suffered minor injuries, and one civilian was taken to a hospital for smoke inhalation.

Fire officials said the blaze was burning west, jumping the 5 Freeway and heading toward areas burned last month in the Sesnon fire in Porter Ranch. Officials said a branch of the fire was burning north toward Santa Clarita as well. The latest evacuations extended as far west as Reseda Boulevard near Sesnon Boulevard.

"The fire is ripping and tearing through everything," said Los Angeles Fire Department Battalion Chief Michael Bowman.

"Our No. 1 priority right now is life, and people have to get out of the path of the fire," said John Tripp, incident commander for the Los Angeles County Fire Department. "We have citizens that are in harm's way right now, and that is our priority."

A Los Angeles County fire official said most of the property losses were in the area near Olive View Medical Center. Firefighters there waged a dramatic battle to protect the hospital in the early-morning hours as patients were taken to upper floors to escape smoke pouring into the lower floors.

Backup power was restored at Olive View shortly before 4 a.m. The most critically ill patients had been moved to Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills, Huntington Hospital in Pasadena and Glendale Adventist Medical Center.

Authorities did not issue a mandatory evacuation until about 1:30 a.m., directing residents to Sylmar High School and San Fernando High School. Many residents had already realized the danger.

"Basically it was chaos and panic," Anne Moore said at Sylmar High. "At the same time people were trying to get out, others were trying to get closer to gawk."

Numerous roads remained closed:

* The 210 Freeway was closed from Osborne to the 5 Freeway.

* Eastbound traffic on the 118 was being diverted to the 405 Freeway.

* But drivers were allowed back on the northbound 5 to the 14 Freeway northbound.

Assistant Chief Donald Frazeur of L.A. Fire Department warned people not to visit the affected area.

"We are encouraging Angelenos not to come to this area, to avoid this area . . . we need these roads clear," he said. "This is a large area, this is a heavily concentrated area, and there are a lot of people standing around watching this instead of leaving."

Sahagun, Olivarez-Giles and Connell are Times staff writers. Times staff writers Andrew Blankstein, Jason Felch, Ruben Vives and James Wagner contributed to this report.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At 5:12 p.m., it's 84 degrees, with five percent humidity -- in other words, hot and tinder dry. The sunset sky is beyond weird: a dark, hazy purple-gray with vivid pink streaks. Sadly, the scent of smoke has intensified; I'm still getting ready in case we get that evacuation call -- and if Mr. G needs to stay overnight at his work site.

ur in our prayers

Thank you, dinz. Trust me on this: Mr. G and I are doing plenty of praying ourselves right now.

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you sincerely for your good thoughts, dog and boardz. Mr. GSBG called about three minutes ago. One of his co-workers has relatives who live in Brea, and they told the co-workers that these three restaurants have burned to the ground. They're not officially confirmed, just reports:

Cedar Creek Inn ...

http://www.cedarcreekinn.com/brea.html

... Outback ...

http://www.outback.com/

... and Souplantation:

http://www.souplantation.com/locations/res...LC-5W56O2413632

(I have an utterly bizarre story to tell about Cedar Creek's karma. PM me if you want to hear it. :blink: )

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. G, who'd mentioned that word about those three eateries was strictly hearsay, phoned them and got voicemail messages. (During any normal Saturday night, a host would've picked up the phone to answer.) He'd also heard that several stores at the SaVi Ranch shopping center (http://www.orangecountyshopping.com/YL-SC-...nch-Center.html) were damaged, as well as Weir Canyon Honda (http://www.weircanyonhonda.com/).

When I stepped outside three minutes ago, it felt like I was breathing into a freshly used grill.

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be GLAD to send some of the 3 days worth of rain we've had here in Eastern NC....your water-logged friend....J

Mr. G, who'd mentioned that word about those three eateries was strictly hearsay, phoned them and got voicemail messages. (During any normal Saturday night, a host would've picked up the phone to answer.) He'd also heard that several stores at the SaVi Ranch shopping center (http://www.orangecountyshopping.com/YL-SC-...nch-Center.html[/post]) were damaged, as well as Weir Canyon Honda (http://www.weircanyonhonda.com/).

When I stepped outside three minutes ago, it felt like I was breathing into a freshly used grill.

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We'd dearly appreciate having that rainfall, big, since the humidity's been hanging at five percent the last few days.

Mr. G phoned a minute ago, alerting me that all Yorba Linda residents who live north and east of the intersection of Yorba Linda Boulevard and Lakeview Avenue -- that's essentially 65,000 people, nearly all of Yorba Linda's residents -- will now need to evacuate. That's about three miles from home, he pointed out, and told me "that we'll need to keep a close watch on things." :(

More news:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://bnews.freedomblogging.com/2008/11/1...es-charred/438/

56 acres, 2,000 acres charred

November 15th, 2008, 6:15 pm

posted by cmeyer

Anaheim Hills-Corona-Yorba Linda and Brea fires

Update: 5:55 p.m.

Acres involved: 2,000

Containment: 0%

Structures damaged or destroyed: 56

* Corona: 14

* Anaheim Hills: 11(Including Cascade Apartments, 8604 E. Whitewater Drive)

* Yorba Linda: 30

* Brea: 1

Evacuations: More than 12,000 people from 4,500 homes in Anaheim alone

Injuries: 4 firefighters, minor

Evacuation centers:

* Tommy Lasorda Field House, 4701 Casa Loma Ave., Yorba Linda

* Travis Ranch Community Center, 5200 Via De La Escuela, Yorba Linda

* Brea Community Center, 695 Madison, Brea

* Valencia High School, at 500 North Bradford Ave., Placentia

* Esperanza High School RELOCATED to Katella High School, 220 E. Wagner Ave., Anaheim

* Anaheim Community Center at 250 E. Center St., Anaheim

* Loara High School, 1765 Euclid, Anaheim

* Annabella Hotel is offering displaced residents a discounted rate- 714-905-1050

Road closures:

The California Highway Patrol is reporting the following closures:

* The westbound 91 freeway, closed on both sides, between Imperial Highway and Corona freeway

* The northbound 241 toll road, closed at Santiago Canyon Road

* The 57 freeway, closed on both sides, between Imperial Highway and the 60 freeway

* The 55 freeway, closed at eastbound 91 freeway; traffic is being diverted to westbound 91

Brea closures:

* Northbound Santa Fe Road, closed at Lambert Road

* Carbon Canyon Road, closed to eastbound traffic at Valencia Road

* Northbound Valencia Road, closed at Lambert Road

Anaheim Hills:

* Santa Ana Canyon Road is closed, between Gypsum Canyon Road and Imperial Highway

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the official word on the Yorba Linda evacuation:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://bnews.freedomblogging.com/2008/11/1...ion-update/770/

ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Nov. 15, 2008

BREAKING NEWS BLOG

Yorba Linda evacuation update

6:15 PST

posted by Martin Wisckol, politics reporter

Savi Ranch shopping center is not burning, at least not yet, according to Register reporter Erin Welch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard about this this morning..

Im sorry to hear..

There was a fire in North San Diego County it scared the living *edit* out of me.. haha..

It took out pretty much Camp Pendleton and all north of San Diego County...

But your in my prayers Jan.. hope everything clears..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When Mr. G came back home tonight, we saw for ourselves the extent of the Yorba Linda fire. Here are some pics he took less than two hours ago:

001.jpg

The flake-like spots visible in the photo are pieces of ash, reflected by the flash of the camera: :mellow:

014.jpg

015.jpg

016.jpg

017.jpg

Unlike the folks you'll see in the forefront of these next three photos, Mr. G made sure to keep us safe by not leaving the car:

022.jpg

023.jpg

024.jpg

These are firefighters from all over Orange County, getting into the fire scenes as fast as they can ...

027.jpg

... and a few more firefighters, ready to joing their cohorts after having dinner at Polly's Pies:

028.jpg

I heard about this this morning..

Im sorry to hear..

There was a fire in North San Diego County it scared the living *edit* out of me.. haha..

It took out pretty much Camp Pendleton and all north of San Diego County...

Those horrible fires last year terrified us too, DP. We love so much about that area, especially Julian, the wonderfully festive and lively mountain city east of you. It's a minor miracle that those wildfires didn't take more terrain than they did -- but the loss of life saddened us both. :) We're glad to know, though, that you and the rest of your crew was unaffected by the fires then, as well as now.

But your in my prayers Jan.. hope everything clears..

Thank you so much, DP. I'll update you guys (that's "y'all" in SoCal speak) on the fires tomorrow morning.

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jan, correct me if I'm wrong, but wildfires don't usually burn on this late in the year, right? At least I can't recall in previous years such a large fire starting and spreading in mid-November...just seems awful late.

Anyways, I know they're hoping today that the wind dies down...I just hope ya'll get some rain or at least more humid air to go along with the less wind. No one should have to worry about a wildfire a week before Thanksgiving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I was told by a guy in Oklahoma that with everything dying and drying up in Fall that is actually makes it better for things to burn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At 5:12 p.m., it's 84 degrees, with five percent humidity -- in other words, hot and tinder dry. The sunset sky is beyond weird: a dark, hazy purple-gray with vivid pink streaks. Sadly, the scent of smoke has intensified; I'm still getting ready in case we get that evacuation call -- and if Mr. G needs to stay overnight at his work site.

Thank you, dinz. Trust me on this: Mr. G and I are doing plenty of praying ourselves right now.

Jan/GSBG

Hope things are ok!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, coleywhitney and Legend, for your caring.

Thankfully, the Yorba Linda/Anaheim Hills fire is about 40% contained by now, and we're much safer now than we were Saturday night. (Still, as local fire officials remind us, it's not a time for anyone living anywhere near the fire zones to get complacent.) Those brutal 40-mph windstorms have dissipated considerably since Sunday morning, although temperatures soared into the low 90s yesterday, making it unbearable to be outdoors, thanks to the heavy, acrid air that rained ash. :( Many cities here had record-high temperatures, less than 10 degrees away from the 100-degree mark.

Right now, at noon Monday, it's 87 degrees -- a minor improvement over the smoldering heat this weekend.

(I'm just hearing a train for the first time in about three days. That's significant in itself, because there's a considerably amount of train traffic each day on the rails that run near our apartment. As you might guess, train transport was halted altogether this weekend because of the risks involved in having it so close to the Yorba Linda/Anaheim Hills firestorms.)

Here's more from the Los Angeles Times and the Orange County Register:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Los Angeles Times: Sayre, Freeway Complex fires 40% contained; Tea fire 90% contained

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-fi...55.story?page=1

Orange County Register: Breaking News Blog/Update: 200 residences, 28,889 acres burned

http://bnews.freedomblogging.com/category/...by-the-numbers/

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jan, correct me if I'm wrong, but wildfires don't usually burn on this late in the year, right? At least I can't recall in previous years such a large fire starting and spreading in mid-November...just seems awful late.

It is late, fallen, but remember that southern California's "winter weather" really doesn't start until late December. November has been one of the area's warmer months for many years, with average temperatures in the high 70s. Thermometer readings in the high 80s are rather common during this month, as are gale-force Santa Ana winds. Add last year's three-inch rainfall total -- the lowest since 1877-78, the first winter that SoCal weather records were kept as official records -- and you've got a recipe for mass fire destruction. :(

Anyways, I know they're hoping today that the wind dies down...I just hope ya'll get some rain or at least more humid air to go along with the less wind. No one should have to worry about a wildfire a week before Thanksgiving.

Surprisingly, SoCals have been swamped by humidity this year, as this summer featured oppressive, sticky, sweat-24-hours-a-day weather with overcast, gray skies. That rain-free humidity did nothing to buffer the region against wildfires.

Speaking of Thanksgiving, the Yorba Linda/Placentia area is scheduled to have a continuation of that warm weather for the next 10 days, with no high temperature cooler than 76 degrees: http://www.weather.com/outlook/health/cold...36hr_topnav_flu. That sounds like a positive forecast, except for the fact that SoCal's been ravaged by firestorms for nearly a week.

Again, friends, thank you sincerely for your concern -- I kept you in mind all throughout the weekend. And I'll be sure to provide updates on the conditions here.

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yikes...I'll add my best wishes too, glad to hear it's looking better. I heard YL mentioned the other night...have a few friends/former clients that live around that area (lived in Carlsbad and worked in Irvine/Corona for a couple of years).

It seems to get worse every year, and always close to the old 'hood.

Good luck and stay safe!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yikes...I'll add my best wishes too, glad to hear it's looking better. I heard YL mentioned the other night...have a few friends/former clients that live around that area (lived in Carlsbad and worked in Irvine/Corona for a couple of years).

Wow, JLB: Anyone living in Carlsbad (that's in northern San Diego County) who commuted through all of Orange County to Corona (in Riverside County) has a fearsome drive indeed -- a round trip of more than 142 miles! :o (For sure, it'd eat more than $1K in gas a month.) Here's hoping that the destination was Irvine, which is in southern Orange County. It's still a goodly distance from Carlsbad, 49.7 miles each way, but that's still quite a hike IMHO.

It seems to get worse every year, and always close to the old 'hood.

Short of getting political, I'll cite a major factor for the increase in fires here: global warming. (Seemingly nonstop construction has something to do with it, too.) It'll probably take a number of years before there's any significant reductions in annual firestorms in the area.

Good luck and stay safe!

That's just what Mr. GSBG and I have been trying to do since this weekend. With more heat and dry air throughout this week, that might be a bit of a challenge. Here's more info:

Los Angeles Times: Wildfire victims grapple with the devastation

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-wi...0,5666046.story[/post]

Los Angeles Times: Family discovers neighborhood's heart after losing home

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-ne...0,7706856.story

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, JLB: Anyone living in Carlsbad (that's in northern San Diego County) who commuted through all of Orange County to Corona (in Riverside County) has a fearsome drive indeed -- a round trip of more than 142 miles! :o (For sure, it'd eat more than $1K in gas a month.) Here's hoping that the destination was Irvine, which is in southern Orange County. It's still a goodly distance from Carlsbad, 49.7 miles each way, but that's still quite a hike IMHO.

Fortunately, I commuted mostly to Irvine (and then with a passenger); when working in Corona I usually stayed in a hotel. But I am too familiar with the highway system from San Diego to Thousand Oaks! :)

Short of getting political, I'll cite a major factor for the increase in fires here: global warming. (Seemingly nonstop construction has something to do with it, too.) It'll probably take a number of years before there's any significant reductions in annual firestorms in the area.

I think the latter more than the former. Too many people living in what is meant to be desert, or close to it. I always said it was a great place to live, it was just too bad so many people had figured that out.

Looks like the heat continues, along with lower winds, thank goodness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fortunately, I commuted mostly to Irvine (and then with a passenger); when working in Corona I usually stayed in a hotel. But I am too familiar with the highway system from San Diego to Thousand Oaks! :)

Ah, yes: the beloved ( :P ) 405 Freeway. (The roads that are known as highways to many folks on the east coast are called freeways on the opposite one.) The 405 is notorious -- and, yes, that's the appropriate use of the word -- for its horrendous traffic, especially around West Los Angeles.

It's a relief to read that you were able to avoid that potential 150-mile round-trip haul, given that a Corona hotel was your home away from home for a short while.

I think the latter more than the former. Too many people living in what is meant to be desert, or close to it. I always said it was a great place to live, it was just too bad so many people had figured that out.

The areas that have been hit hardest by the wildfires, JLP, are in the native shrubland/plant community known as chaparral (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaparral), a habitat marked by considerably cooler temperatures and fuller vegetation than desert terrain. And it turns out that global warming may well play a bigger role than we'd realized in relation to the increase in wildfires in southern California:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-cl...0,1660345.story

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

IS CLIMATE CHANGE TO BLAME FOR STRING OF SOUTHLAND FIRES?

Scientists say no definitive link has been demonstrated between rising temperatures and wildfire occurrence in Southern California's chaparral country.

By Bettina Boxall

Is climate change to blame for the string of destructive fires that have hit Southern California in recent years?

Research has shown an increase in large wildfires in some western forest regions in recent decades, particularly in the northern Rocky Mountains and, to some extent, California's Sierra Nevada.

Warming is reducing the snowpack there and causing it to melt earlier, resulting in a longer, drier fire season.

But scientists say no definitive link has been demonstrated between rising temperatures and wildfires in Southern California's chaparral country.

In a statement after the firestorms that struck the region in October 2007, UC Merced assistant professor Anthony Westerling said that while there have been big wildfire years, no statistically significant fire trends are evident in the coastal chaparral belt.

"We can't finger climate change," said Dan Cayan, a climate researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

The current drought in the Southwest may simply be part of the normal cycle of wet and dry spells. But looking over the next century, Cayan said, regions with a Mediterranean climate such as Southern California are expected to get drier.

"I have to believe that is going to make us more vulnerable to some of these more intense fire episodes."

Boxall is a Times staff writer.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Looks like the heat continues, along with lower winds, thank goodness.

The heat's still raging on. At 12:09 p.m., it's 85 degrees outside, with 12% humidity. Thankfully, the winds have dropped, but homes are still in danger of being burned by seed-sized pieces of flaming debris buffeted about by gentle breezes. Mr. GSBG, on one of his two days off this week, is taking photos of the fire areas about three miles from home; I'll post those pics once he returns home.

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. GSBG, on one of his two days off this week, is taking photos of the fire areas about three miles from home; I'll post those pics once he returns home.

Mr. G returned home about 45 minutes ago. Because I'm such a good egg (yeah, right :P ), I'm happy to postpone lunch for a while until I share his brand-new pics with my fellow Caniacs. Don't think for a second, folks, that we don't realize how fortunate we are to have our home at least four miles from the flames:

These pics were posted in the exact order that Mr. G took them. I'll include more photos in a post immediately after completing this one:

001-1.jpg

002.jpg

003.jpg

004.jpg

005.jpg

006.jpg

007.jpg

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the rest:

008.jpg

009.jpg

010.jpg

011.jpg

012.jpg

013.jpg

The grief and loss that the newly homeless folks must be facing is more than I can imagine, so I'll do whatever I can to help as a volunteer over the next few weeks. (By the way, the thermometer's just hit 89 degrees, at 1:50 p.m. Pacific Time. :unsure: )

Jan/GSBG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...