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O.K., 52 votes to this point, and more than half (31) fall into the first three options, all of which say we've got the talent we need, and just under half of all votes (thus far) say we lack hunger/spark/drive.

In addition to reading more about how to address that issue, I'd like to know whom the folks (fully one third of us) advocating a major trade would go after, why, and which guy(s) on our roster they are willing to give up to get them.

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Our forwards are too small (Whitney/Samsonov/Larose) or play too small (Stillman/Cullen). Our D is too old (Hedican/Wesley) or unwilling to make the opponent to pay the price (Kaberle/Tanabe) in our end. This makes the team very injury prone. We have very little in the way of prospects to make up for these injuries when they occur. Something has to be done to rectify this situation.

So you're saying that Stillman and Cullen are ineffective because they're not uber-physical players? Do you realize how ludicrous you sound? I mean, we do need to get some more size, particularly in back, but to point out guys like Cullen and Stillman and saying that they should toss their bodies around is just stupid.

I applaud you CA. Bravo. You summed up exactly how it sounds. Small players can weave in and out of the defense and score way easier than 6'6" people. Same in every sport. Small people tend to be faster. Whitney, Stillman, and yes, Samsonov, are (becoming) our best players. Staal is on game most of the time, but Whitney goes out all the time. And I don't remember who said the 7 points in 7 games thing, but now 8 points in 8 games (think that's right, now). Wesley IS our best defenseman. Too Old? Maybe someone needs strong glasses, because you aren't seeing his and Hedican's play. Opponent paying the price... checking... yes, they do that!!!! And when injuries occur, we have great AHL players to come up and step in for us!!!!

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O.K., 52 votes to this point, and more than half (31) fall into the first three options, all of which say we've got the talent we need, and just under half of all votes (thus far) say we lack hunger/spark/drive.

In addition to reading more about how to address that issue, I'd like to know whom the folks (fully one third of us) advocating a major trade would go after, why, and which guy(s) on our roster they are willing to give up to get them.

Tradeable:

Stillman - FA and age, possibility to sign after season

Ladd - high upside, dont see him ever amounting to what others see his potential as

Commodore - FA, probably will test the market and be offered more than worth and we're willing to pay

Returns:

Suter or Liles - age & offensive minded D-men

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None of the above.

GSBG's answer: Tighten the defense, and play a physical, grinding, blue-collar game for 60 minutes every game. (The on-ice and off-ice personnel are fine.)

That's my two cents, from overcast and chilly Placentia, Calif. ... B)

Jan/GSBG

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None of the above.

GSBG's answer: Tighten the defense, and play a physical, grinding, blue-collar game for 60 minutes every game. (The on-ice and off-ice personnel are fine.)

That's my two cents, from overcast and chilly Placentia, Calif. ... B)

Jan/GSBG

Well said Jan, this is the key to our success.

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THE PROBLEMS WITH THIS TEAM DOES NOT LIE WITH ANY ONE AREA. we have no bonifide # 1 defenceman, either defensivly or offensivly. thusly offensivly we have two forwards on the points which allow short handed chances also it allows the defence to concentrate on the fowards down low limiting the scoring chances. defensivly we cant clear the front of the net out. also defence is not just defenceman, it is played by anyone on the ice without the puck. our current group of forwards seem to have lost that work ethic that we had when we won the cup. maybe they are just happy with winning it once and are not as hungry. maybe they are a couple years older and dont wanna pay the price. maybe some of them are in declining skills. also injuies, cole seems to be hurt alot, williams, i dont think that ladd has progressed as we would have liked. also our goaltending has been inconsistant. all goalies have hot and cold streaks, but a lot of the problems come from the items listed above. you also have to look at the league, anyone can beat anyone on any given night. its just a very even league with the exception of a couple teams. pairity is here.i dont think bringing a hitler like attitude from a coaching staff will work with a veteran group. bottom line is that there are problems with the chemistry on this team, its JR's job and the coaches jobs to straighten this out. i personally think that if a turn around doesnt happen that there will be major changes. just my .02 cents

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Well said Jan, this is the key to our success.

Thanks for the props, cheap. They're much appreciated.

During last night's Ducks-Blues game, Mr. GSBG and I watched a tightly played, extremely disciplined match between two teams with years of ill feeling between them. Even with such long-standing anger, both clubs managed to keep the egregious fighting to a minimum (heavens! George Parros didn't even drop the gloves at center ice! :blink: ) and relied instead on smart, well-timed forechecking; resolve to keep opponents out of their own zone; smothering, airtight defense; and Vezina-caliber netminding with heroic saves. The result: a thrilling game, won in a shootout by longtime former Duck center Andy McDonald. (Indeed, knowledgeable hockey fans know how superbly a 1-0 game can be played, and this one should go into the record books as Exhibit A of that concept.)

That, fellow Caniacs, is a game that our guys should study in the video room to see what great defense and outstanding goaltending by both teams are all about. It's an example that if the Canes were to follow from now on -- 60 minutes of every game, every season, for the foreseeable future -- they'd go deep into the postseason each year. As a happy result, they'd likely celebrate another Cup. B)

Jan/GSBG

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Hi RedSox-n-Canes,

I lived in Marblehead and worked at Kenmore Square near Fenway. My first hockey exposure was the Bruins vs. Canadiens. The Bruins won the game and the fight. I loved it. The old Boston Garden with that organ music playing and the fans standing and yelling nearly non-stop. I got in to see the Celtics. too. The organist also played at a bar in Marblehead that I frequented and he got me in somehow. I don't remember how now. (Well, one of the bars I frequented. Don't press me, I'm trying to think of one I didn't frequent, OK?) Ah, the memories or lack there of in the morning. B)

So much for the old times... You say, "I don't think hiring a consultant or assistant that can handle our D is a good idea either. We paid "LOTS" of money for aged veterans with experience for a reason. I feel they can put their heads together and coach themselves out of this."

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't one of our problems on D that we are not always on the same page in the back? What a coach does not need IMNSHO is his veterans putting their heads together and coaching themselves. Playing and coaching are entirely different realms of knowledge. Some of the greatest players have been awful coaches and vice versa. It is almost a detriment to being a great coach to have been a star player. Most truly great players are operating on instincts. Good coaches know how to develop instincts and skills.

The Carolina franchise and the other small market franchises will likely not have a team full of stars such as Detroit during our first Cup run. Their lineup sounded like Hall of Fame nominees. What we did was have a group of good players who were better as a team than the sum of their individual parts. I suggest for our D to prevail we need to be playing a scheme that is suitable for our talent level, play with heart and courage, and play with confidence.

Another problem with your verterans doing the thinking and coaching is when one of those veterans screws up. Then it bocomes the ever popular, "Do as I say do, not as I did last night."

Then again I might be wrong. Maybe this line of thinking is only good for football, soccer, basketball, baseball, and doubles tennis. Hockey could be a whole nother ballgame, but I don't think so.

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"I feel having so many older players may be causing power struggles in the lockerroom. We have too many Chiefs in the tribe....this causes negativity and drop in morale. Most teams have one or two aged veterans to lead a younger team."

Did having that near all-star team in Detroit in our Cup run a few years back, cause morale problems? I would think that having younger players healthy scratches for repeated games would be more likely to cause morale problems than veterans worrying about who wore the C. A glance at our veterans looks like a Who's Who for character to me. Who did you have in mind, Wesley(39), Brindy(37), Hedican(37), Stillman(34), Whitney(35), Walker(34), Kaberle(34), Graham(32), Wallin (32) or Cullen(31)? Of that group only Graham seems to be a possibility.

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